LAYERED TIPS

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
About the grittiness of a sidewalk.
You exaggerate a bit. It's not near that bad. I have 150 left over from some body work I did, tried it for a tip install, and have never had a tip come off since.

If 220 and 180 isnt cutting it for you, use 150.

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Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
You exaggerate a bit. It's not near that bad. I have 150 left over from some body work I did, tried it for a tip install, and have never had a tip come off since.
It was a tongue-in-cheek comment.

My emoji function went off of my AZB account some months ago so I can't let people know when I'm joking. Wish I knew how to fix that.
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
Never rubbed a sidewalk. Take your word for it.
I've never "rubbed" one either.

But I have fallen off of my bicycle in my youth and gotten a pretty good "road rash" from them. I've also used a sidewalk/driveway to "sand" burs off of wood/2x4's when doing home projects that don't require detailed workmanship.

But like I said above....I was just being my typical smart-ass.

Maniac
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've never "rubbed" one either.

But I have fallen off of my bicycle in my youth and gotten a pretty good "road rash" from them. I've also used a sidewalk/driveway to "sand" burs off of wood/2x4's when doing home projects that don't require detailed workmanship.

But like I said above....I was just being my typical smart-ass.

Maniac
Just jackin' with 'ya. I like it.
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
It was a tongue-in-cheek comment.

My emoji function went off of my AZB account some months ago so I can't let people know when I'm joking. Wish I knew how to fix that.
Not sure if you were being sarcastic or really can't add emojis.

So if needed you can just type the text equivalent i.e. semicolon right parenthesis convert when you save
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;)

or if on a PC hold windows key and press semicolon for a popup:
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Chili Palmer

funking idiot
Silver Member
The newer layered tips give you better control and more english if you play and really try to control the cue ball. But, you will have to find out what tip hardness is best for you. Soft tips will generally give you more english if you use a lot, but can mushroom and lose their shape over time. A harder layered tip will hold its shape a lot better and still allow you to use english. Kamui and Morakami both make a nice line of layered tips. However, if you want to stay with a good non-layered tip, I'd switch to Triangle tips. They hold chalk well, hold their shape well, and don't tend to glaze/harden with age and cause miscues like I've seen with LePro tips.

Well said. I think Triangle has proven itself time and time again that it is the best non-layered tip out there - for people who like hard tips, I can't speak for softer tips as I'm not a fan.

I chuckle at the people who go buy the newest and shiniest thing and say it's the best so everything else now sucks. Simply not the case, Triangle has been around forever, much like Master, and 10's of thousands of people still use them with no issues. I have tried multiple layered tips and have come to the conclusion that I like Kamui tips, doesn't mean I'm going to piss on the stuff that has served me well for 30 years.
 

Chili Palmer

funking idiot
Silver Member
It was a tongue-in-cheek comment.

My emoji function went off of my AZB account some months ago so I can't let people know when I'm joking. Wish I knew how to fix that.

Click the [ ] button in the top right corner, it should toggle the BB code on and off, which should allow the emoji's to work ;)

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buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not all sandpaper is the same. They are designed for different purposes. Different sandpapers of the same grit can be very different.
Yes, sandpaper of one brand might be different from another only in the type of abrasive used, or if designed for wet/dry use, But it is usually very consistent from one brand to another for particles per square centimeter.

All I said was if 220 or 180 isn't cutting it, use 150. That's all I use.
 

Chili Palmer

funking idiot
Silver Member
Not all sandpaper is the same. They are designed for different purposes. Different sandpapers of the same grit can be very different.
Yes, sandpaper of one brand might be different from another only in the type of abrasive used, or if designed for wet/dry use, But it is usually very consistent from one brand to another for particles per square centimeter.

All I said was if 220 or 180 isn't cutting it, use 150. That's all I use.

Here's a little Grainger article about sandpaper and it's qualities.

Sandpaper Grit Chart & Guide - Grainger

Here is their statement at the bottom regarding qualities of sandpaper. Clearly, if you buy enough sandpaper, which I have, you will notice a difference in brand names. I've clearly noticed differences in quality of paper but it was never so bad I had to worry about. That being said, although I have an ok stock of sandpaper I will generally find one I like to work with and use it - but I never put any serious thought into why they were different, I just figured one was more cheaply made but the quote below pretty much answers any of the questions I would've had ;)

*****
What's the Difference Between Sandpaper Grit and Sandpaper Grade?

Grit size refers to the specific size of the abrasive grain (36, 60, 120, etc.), while grade is a broader term, with each grade including a range of grits. For example, medium grade includes grit sizes between 80 and 150.
*****
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Here's a little Grainger article about sandpaper and it's qualities.

Sandpaper Grit Chart & Guide - Grainger

Here is their statement at the bottom regarding qualities of sandpaper. Clearly, if you buy enough sandpaper, which I have, you will notice a difference in brand names. I've clearly noticed differences in quality of paper but it was never so bad I had to worry about. That being said, although I have an ok stock of sandpaper I will generally find one I like to work with and use it - but I never put any serious thought into why they were different, I just figured one was more cheaply made but the quote below pretty much answers any of the questions I would've had ;)

*****
What's the Difference Between Sandpaper Grit and Sandpaper Grade?

Grit size refers to the specific size of the abrasive grain (36, 60, 120, etc.), while grade is a broader term, with each grade including a range of grits. For example, medium grade includes grit sizes between 80 and 150.
*****
The stuff i learn here. And friends tell me its a dying site. Huh, hardly. ;) Seriously that's pretty good info.
 

Chili Palmer

funking idiot
Silver Member
The stuff i learn here. And friends tell me its a dying site. Huh, hardly. ;) Seriously that's pretty good info.

Google is your friend :)

RE: dying site, with modern social media forums are definitely going downhill (and have been for years) but I've noticed that in every field of interest there is usually one stand out place for information (sailing - cruisersforum.com, Jeep - jeepforum.com, etc.) and AZB is IT for billiards. Member participation may come and go but this place is the de-facto standard for billiards information and, more importantly, billiards history. The amount of information that pops up regarding who's who, what happened 20-30-100 years ago is absolutely amazing and with any luck it never goes away.
 

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Here's a little Grainger article about sandpaper and it's qualities.

Sandpaper Grit Chart & Guide - Grainger

Here is their statement at the bottom regarding qualities of sandpaper. Clearly, if you buy enough sandpaper, which I have, you will notice a difference in brand names. I've clearly noticed differences in quality of paper but it was never so bad I had to worry about. That being said, although I have an ok stock of sandpaper I will generally find one I like to work with and use it - but I never put any serious thought into why they were different, I just figured one was more cheaply made but the quote below pretty much answers any of the questions I would've had ;)

*****
What's the Difference Between Sandpaper Grit and Sandpaper Grade?

Grit size refers to the specific size of the abrasive grain (36, 60, 120, etc.), while grade is a broader term, with each grade including a range of grits. For example, medium grade includes grit sizes between 80 and 150.
*****
Yes... you are correct but all I referred to was the number of grit in a square centimeter. Look, you guys are making way too big a deal about this. I know sandpaper intimately. As I've said before I used to do body work. What the does the differences in sandpaper have to do with sanding a tip to install it? All you're doing is scuffing up the back of the tip and scuffing up the ferrule. And I will say again... If 180 or 220 isn't course enough to hold the glue, use something a little coarser.
 
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starboy

New member
I have been using Le pro tips for 40 years. Is there any advantage to
the expensive layered tips?

Thanks
check out the mako shark medium and soft tips on ebay. by leanbilliards who also has a youtube channel by same name. he appears to be a pro. as creator of them he shows a yt video comparing them to kamui and another top brand. cost of mako shark is about 9 dollars.......and tell him freeeemystic sent you......
 

thiendiatuyet

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I used to use LePro. Constant maintenance because of mushrooming and glazing. When the tip got down to the point I really liked it, there was nothing left and needed changed. As far as I'm concerned that's what inconsistency truly is. It plays softer in the beginning and when you get it down to where it's firm and you really like the feel of it, it's done. It's a gradual but consistent change in the way it feels. And then when you put a new one on you start all over again. I ended up using 3 per year.

Then I tried the tiger brand tips. First one I tried was Everest. It was okay, just a little on the soft side for me. And needed maintenance. Then I went to the Tiger Onyx. Good tip. Fairly maintenance-free, consistent through its life. But when they doubled the price from $12 to $24(because of MAP pricing), I dumped them. Everest gave a year of service....Onyx, a year and a half.

Then tried Morri hard. Very consistent through its life. Doesnt glaze. Shape it new and play, shape again, and very little after that. Burnish the side every couple of weeks, and occasionally reshape. I been getting 2 years plus out of one. Current one is 2 1/2 years on Predator shaft. Might need a change in 6 months or so. For $12 to $14 bucks, I think it's the best value for my money AND for consistency. And I've noticed no glue issues as mentioned by Greg.

Haven't tried a compressed LePro milk dud. Reports are they should last a lot longer, glaze less, and are more consistent throughout their useful life span. If LePro made a hard tip, I think I would have liked them better.
Try Zan Grip Hard and it will last several year plus maintenance free.
 
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