linen wraps

cribbeecues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Was wondering if anyone can provide info on how the production
cue companies put the wrap on a cue so quickly? Do they do it by
hand or do they have a special machine to put the linen on? If they
have a special tool does anyone have a picture or video on it
being used and where to get one? thanx in advance cribbeecues
 

macguy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Was wondering if anyone can provide info on how the production
cue companies put the wrap on a cue so quickly? Do they do it by
hand or do they have a special machine to put the linen on? If they
have a special tool does anyone have a picture or video on it
being used and where to get one? thanx in advance cribbeecues

They may wrap them under power but someone has to put the cue in the machine, pin the linen and get it started, cut the linen when done and pin it at the end. This has to be hand done. If you ever see the TV show "How is it made" it is surprising even in our technology age how much still has to be done by hand. You will find these interesting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adUbpn7WZYA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4T2pXa9znwY
 
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KJ Cues

Pro Cue Builder & Repair
Silver Member
It depends on what you mean by "so quickly".
Do you have a number in minutes to go with that statement?
I don't know about the big boys or anyone else for that matter
but I routinely do a linen wrap, start to finish in 20 mins.
That includes, the start/peg hole, prepping the wrap groove and adjusting
it's depth if necessary, applying the glue, applying the linen, double pressing
and clean-up. That's average though pretty consistent. I don't need to hurry.

I've envisioned a machine to linen-wrap cues though I don't see it as being practical.
As was mentioned, you'd still have to load the machine, thread the machine for whatever
color you're doing, peg the hole, let the machine apply the linen then you'd
cinch the linen at the end. All done manually.
The only advantage I can see is that the machine would be capable of maintaining
consistent tension on the cordage as it was being applied.
At first blush that may seem like a real plus but in my 20+ yrs of doing wraps, that's
never been a problem.
 

manwon

"WARLOCK 1"
Silver Member
Was wondering if anyone can provide info on how the production
cue companies put the wrap on a cue so quickly? Do they do it by
hand or do they have a special machine to put the linen on? If they
have a special tool does anyone have a picture or video on it
being used and where to get one? thanx in advance cribbeecues

What do you call quickly? It normally takes me around 20 to 30 minutes from start to finish to install a linen wrap, and that includes wait time while the glue dries and the clean up after.
 

SouthernDraw

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I wouldn't think that "quickly" would be necessary for the bigger companies (at least nowadays). They are paying chinese workers pennies per hr. That's how you save money today. No health care, no no pension, no workmans comp, no eo, no epa... A business dream world

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
 

macguy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I wouldn't think that "quickly" would be necessary for the bigger companies (at least nowadays). They are paying chinese workers pennies per hr. That's how you save money today. No health care, no no pension, no workmans comp, no eo, no epa... A business dream world

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk

Kind of sounds like the same deal a lot of cue makers working for themselves have.
 

Mase

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I know that Dufferin had 2 of Joe Porpers lathes set up for the linen wraps. As mentioned before the start and finish was by hand but laying the linen (or whatever in Dufferin's case) was done automatically by the lathe.
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
i'll say that if you want to actually do the wrapping itself QUICKER, using a much higher RPM you first must use some plastic tubing or leather to hold the string so it don't cut your fingers off and secondly you will need to stand back at least a good 6ft from the lathe to work the linnen. I wrap my cues pretty dam fast with good tension, now pressing and such takes more time of course but you can quicken the wrap phase of the process by increasing RPM and standing farther back so as to control the string......just wrapping the cue takes me all of 20seconds I'd say. Whole process is around 20-30 min same as most others.

hope that helps,
Grey Ghost
 

BLACKHEARTCUES

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I remember watching Jim Mcdermott Jr. doing wraps at the Mcdermott factory, in the 80's. He did them by hand, like most of us do, here. After watching him, I went home & started doing them myself. That was 1984, when I started my repair work. I have no idea, how they do them there today...JER

P.S. I don't use "glue", I use CLEAR URATHANE. It goes on clean, drys very quickly & I've never had a failure. One of the many tricks I stole from my visits to the Mcdermott Factory. Jim Mcdermott Sr. showed me his 1st lathe & I stole that idea too. A 10 inch Atlas with a back chuck made from a pipe threader. THANKS JIM...
 

manwon

"WARLOCK 1"
Silver Member
i'll say that if you want to actually do the wrapping itself QUICKER, using a much higher RPM you first must use some plastic tubing or leather to hold the string so it don't cut your fingers off and secondly you will need to stand back at least a good 6ft from the lathe to work the linnen. I wrap my cues pretty dam fast with good tension, now pressing and such takes more time of course but you can quicken the wrap phase of the process by increasing RPM and standing farther back so as to control the string......just wrapping the cue takes me all of 20seconds I'd say. Whole process is around 20-30 min same as most others.

hope that helps,
Grey Ghost


That is not how Crocodile Dundee would do it, he would just hold the linen between his two front teeth and let her rip!!!:D
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
That is not how Crocodile Dundee would do it, he would just hold the linen between his two front teeth and let her rip!!!:D

yea and end up just like homeboy in jackass3...."lamborghini tooth pull"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUplcWdqpMk

that was some real pain right there and it was some of the funniest stuff EVER....painfully funny lmfao

i do my wrapping on a 1/3hp machine and thats plenty to at least give you a good silce.........also with a foot pedal that reaches comfortably at that length so i can still control the speed, my spool doles out through a set of rollers so i dont have to fight the spool looping the cord. Works well for me but took a bit of practice.
 
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manwon

"WARLOCK 1"
Silver Member
yea and end up just like homeboy in jackass3...."lamborghini tooth pull"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUplcWdqpMk

that was some real pain right there and it was some of the funniest stuff EVER....painfully funny lmfao

i do my wrapping on a 1/3hp machine and thats plenty to at least give you a good silce.........also with a foot pedal that reaches comfortably at that length so i can still control the speed, my spool doles out through a set of rollers so i dont have to fight the spool looping the cord. Works well for me but took a bit of practice.



I have a Porper repair lathe that I use for wraps and many other job's. I have a tension device I use in addition to holding the wrap material between my fingers.

I learned the hard way many years ago not to hold it two tight, and while did not lose a finger I do have a couple burns that left permanent scars.:D However, since I designed my high speed tension device that is no longer a problem.

Take Care
 

scdiveteam

Rick Geschrey
Silver Member
I have a Porper repair lathe that I use for wraps and many other job's. I have a tension device I use in addition to holding the wrap material between my fingers.

I learned the hard way many years ago not to hold it two tight, and while did not lose a finger I do have a couple burns that left permanent scars.:D However, since I designed my high speed tension device that is no longer a problem.

Take Care

Craig,

How about sharing a pic or two of the tensioning device, it sounds interesting.

I run my atlas at full speed and hold between my hands in a piece of leather. I hold tension and render the wrap at a 3 degree angle. Your idea and the tensioning device sounds like it make provide more tension than I am giving.

Rick Geschrey
 

manwon

"WARLOCK 1"
Silver Member
Craig,

How about sharing a pic or two of the tensioning device, it sounds interesting.

I run my atlas at full speed and hold between my hands in a piece of leather. I hold tension and render the wrap at a 3 degree angle. Your idea and the tensioning device sounds like it make provide more tension than I am giving.

Rick Geschrey


Rick, I have included a few photo's below don't laugh while it is simple it certainly provides all the tension needed, it kinda works like a fishhing pole. If for some reason during the wrap process something hangs up or snags the wire that the linen is going over in the pictures takes the force not your fingers.

1.jpg

2.jpg

Take Care
 

Rockin' Robin

Mr. Texas Express
Silver Member
The McD factory still wraps cues the same way. The wrap goes on pretty quick, and it is the finishing and pressing that takes the most time. What is really amazing is how quick their leather specialists apply, cut, and press the leather. It just takes a little practice and a few thousand wraps before it becomes second nature.

Case in point, Ted Harris once got down with a bet that once he pegged the start of a wrap, he could finish to the other end without a snag or overlay while blindfolded and jumping up and down on one foot. He collected the cash.
 

ratcues

No yodeling, please.
Silver Member
I put linen on by hand, the same way most others do it. We used to get some cues in with no wraps and then wrap them in-house. I was able to avaerage 2.5 minutes per wrap. That includes the anchor holes and pressing. If I have to remove the old wrap, prep the channel, drill anchors holes, then go through my normal process, it takes 5-10 minutes.

I have seen some McD wrapping lathes that have a tension mechanism on the back side of the lathe. It was attached to a free floating carriage and followed along as the linen spun on the cue.
 

Arnot Wadsworth

Senior Cuemaker
Silver Member
It is amazing to hear how fast some of you cuemakers install a linen wrap.

I never considered speed in the equation when it came to any aspect of cuemaking. The main consideration here at Arnot Q Custom Cues is in doing the job to perfection. If it takes a little more time to do it right then that's just the way it has to be.

Please don't take this as a "slam" because I know many of you build a great cue and do wonderful repair work. I'm just never thinking about how long it takes when I am working.

Good Cuemaking
 

97Buick22

Go Blackhawks!
Silver Member
I put linen on by hand as well and I have gotten used to burning my hands over time.:confused: I should just use a piece of leather to hold the linen with tension insted of burning my skin.:thumbup: I have been doing it that way so long it's a hard habit to break. I remember Brad Ziconne formerly Mystique Cues (aka Omega DPK) putting the linen on with the lathe set for threading and just letting the lathe thread the linen on perfectly with a little tension device he made.
 

KJ Cues

Pro Cue Builder & Repair
Silver Member
QUICK TIP

Try wearing a leather glove on the hand that's 'feeding' the linen.
You'll eventually burn-through the leather though.
You can keep duct-taping the cut or slide a short pc of Tygon tubing
over the finger of the glove that's getting sliced.
The Tygon will provide drag.
KJ

Damn Jer, you're quick. Or just lucky???
 
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