Playing better without the measles CB

jsp

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Since I bought my pool table (Diamond Pro) 4 years ago, I've shelved the red circle CB that came with my Super Aramith Pros in favor of the measles CB that I bought separately. Just yesterday I decided to start playing the 9-ball ghost with the red circle CB instead of the measles CB. My game improved INSTANTLY by a ball or two. I've always thought it was easier moving the red circle CB around the table compared to the measles CB, but I had no idea how much that would translate to such a noticeable "improvement" in my offensive 9-ball game. For the past year playing with the measles CB, I've been averaging losing to the 9-ball ghost 7-2 or 7-3, and never winning more than 4 games in a race to 7. Just yesterday hitting around with the red circle, I almost beat the ghost for the very first time losing 6-7 (I was actually up 6-4 but just couldn't seal the deal). Everything just feels easier with the red circle.

I'm trying to rationalize my somewhat drastic improvement in play. Is it really because my shot making accuracy and position-play precision go up because I can use less stroke/spin to move the red circle CB by the same amount? Maybe it's because I'm getting less throw with the red circle CB since it's cleaner and has less wear and tear compared to my measles CB? Maybe the improvement is all mental? Maybe it's all a coincidence?

Anyone else have a similar experience?
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
Are both balls the same weight and made from the same resin? Try bouncing both off the floor and see how they react.

As a control you can use a numbered ball as a cue ball and play a couple of games and see if there is any difference.
 

scottjen26

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The cue balls do play a little different in my experience - red circle, red dot, blue circle, measles, etc. Slightly different compositions, weights, who knows what else. I'm not sure what the exact differences are, but I know there has to be just from experience.

I think in general we adjust to a different cue ball, or a different set of balls, pretty quickly, just like adjusting to a different table unless conditions are drastically different. Of course the ability to adjust will vary by person, skill level, etc.

I've actually had to switch cue balls between matches (the room didn't have all the same type of sets), it wasn't a big deal, but I did notice it was a bit easier to move one ball around vs. the other. Don't know that it made me play better or worse.

Does sound like a drastic change for you in the positive. My guess is you liked the feedback you were getting with the lighter cueball and therefore gained confidence and played better. I guess keep playing with the red circle and see if results continue, if so you'll have to start carrying your own cue ball and sneaking it into play!
Scott
 

nrhoades

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I bet its mental.

I bought a set of Aramith 2 1/4" snooker balls as a novelty item. They are the same as Aramith pool balls in everyway except for the color. For some reason the red plays tricks on my eyes and I strangely miss some normal shots. Even Joe Tucker felt the weirdness when I brought them to his house. You eventually get used to them.

BTW, Snooker is fun to play on a 9'ft table, but needs a little modification to make it feel more "poolish". I'm working on a game.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
It could easily be a result of how polished/clean the new ball is compared to the worn ball.

Are there any specific shots that are easier to control with the new ball?
 

stljohnny

knowledge > execution. :(
Silver Member
Ha! I just had the opposite experience. Last week, I brought my measle ball to the pool hall to practice, as I hadn't used it in forever. I played better than I had a long, long time. I know there's a difference in weight (and size, if the table balls are old), but for whatever reason, that night, I played great. I should try it again to see, but in the end, I think it's more of a mental thing.

However, I will say, that (likely) due to the extra weight of the measel ball, I was able to draw into short position more accurately than I do with a red circle - which I almost always overdraw. If I try and compensate for it, I usually under hit it. Of course, that means I just need to work on my speed (and I obviously do) but it's almost like my natural stroke is made for the measle ball. I should mention that when I *really* started practicing/playing seriously, it was with a measle ball to check for any unwanted english, and I guess I never got out of that stroke, or couldn't make the adjustment to red circles.
 

DogsPlayingPool

"What's in your wallet?"
Silver Member
Yeah, I notice a difference between the measle ball and the Brunswick blue circle. Not sure I can exactly explain the difference but there seems to be one.
 

PoolBum

Ace in the side.
Silver Member
I bet its mental.

Speaking of which, I don't remember anyone mentioning this but those dots on the measles ball make it look bigger to your eyes, even if it's not. And if it looks bigger, your mind is gonna play some tricks on you when it tries to figure out how to move that ball around compared to the red circle ball.
 

Quesports

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have never weighed them or bounced them off the floor as one poster suggested, but I do find the measle ball to play differently over the red circle ball. I do not normally play with the measle ball but whenever I have to it takes me an hour to get used to it. Personally I think it's a different weight and that throws me off until I adjust for it.
 

walrus_3d

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The weights of the different cue balls aren't allowed to vary too much. The real difference is in the consistency due to the materials involved. Obviously a resin ball with a magnetic layer is going to react differently due to its unique physics as compared to a solid resin ball, or even differing types of resin.

I think there is something to the question of the appearance of the ball, too. Obviously the measle ball looks wildly different from the other cue balls, but just having a green logo on the ball instead of a red one can make a psychological difference, if you believe you play better with one ball than the other.

I'd say ignore the question of better or easier, and focus on the fact that there is a difference. If a ball is "easier" to draw, then it's "harder" to stop. Plain and simple, the shots must be played differently with different cue balls. This just points out the necessity of warming up prior to playing a match.

Personally, I think the creation of the oversized cue ball is the single worst thing to happen to any recreational activity, ever, with the possible exception of Roseanne Barr singing the national anthem. Maybe.
 

bignick31985

Life Long Learner
Silver Member
The bar we shoot out of has 2 regular Aramith balls with the Panther on them. One table has a mud ball.

I take my measles ball up there on free pool night, and everyone hates it, lol. "I hate shooting with that ball!!!" etc, etc.

I love the ball, but the second best is the regular Aramith one. I can get so much more action on the measles ball, plus it does what you tell it to do.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
The 'measle' cue-ball has some issues...
..it is not wearing well...after a few months the red spots go a bit flat.
Not just in pool, the carom players are finding this happens also.

I'm going back to red and blue circle cue-balls
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Since I bought my pool table (Diamond Pro) 4 years ago, I've shelved the red circle CB that came with my Super Aramith Pros in favor of the measles CB that I bought separately. Just yesterday I decided to start playing the 9-ball ghost with the red circle CB instead of the measles CB. My game improved INSTANTLY by a ball or two. I've always thought it was easier moving the red circle CB around the table compared to the measles CB, but I had no idea how much that would translate to such a noticeable "improvement" in my offensive 9-ball game. For the past year playing with the measles CB, I've been averaging losing to the 9-ball ghost 7-2 or 7-3, and never winning more than 4 games in a race to 7. Just yesterday hitting around with the red circle, I almost beat the ghost for the very first time losing 6-7 (I was actually up 6-4 but just couldn't seal the deal). Everything just feels easier with the red circle.

I'm trying to rationalize my somewhat drastic improvement in play. Is it really because my shot making accuracy and position-play precision go up because I can use less stroke/spin to move the red circle CB by the same amount? Maybe it's because I'm getting less throw with the red circle CB since it's cleaner and has less wear and tear compared to my measles CB? Maybe the improvement is all mental? Maybe it's all a coincidence?

Anyone else have a similar experience?


We just had a long discussion about this over at one pocket.org. In a nutshell, some guys, including Mr.Incardona, believe it's all in your head. But a number of us, including Bill Stroud (yes, I know) feel that there is a noticeable difference in how the Measles Ball plays as compared to the Red Circle. I noticed the difference at the US 1Pocket Open last year. It was the first event I had ever played in with the MB, so I practiced with one in the weeks leading up to the event and right off I could tell there was a difference. After a couple of weeks playing with just the MB, I then played with a RC and it was like night and day. YMMV.

oh yeah, I prefer the RC.

Lou Figueroa
 

jsp

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It could easily be a result of how polished/clean the new ball is compared to the worn ball.
I definitely think this plays some factor.

Are there any specific shots that are easier to control with the new ball?
I find that draw shots are much easier. I also feel that the red circle rolls further compared to the measles. So I can get more action on the CB with less stroking effort. And I think my overall potting and position accuracy have gone up because I'm not stroking/spinning the red circle CB as much as I need to the measles for the same position.

I know I'm not the only one who feels the two balls play differently. I'm aware there have been numerous threads comparing the size and weights of the two CBs. Has there been any analysis comparing the moment of inertia between the two balls? Or maybe the exact material composition between the two balls?
 

jsp

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
We just had a long discussion about this over at one pocket.org. In a nutshell, some guys, including Mr.Incardona, believe it's all in your head. But a number of us, including Bill Stroud (yes, I know) feel that there is a noticeable difference in how the Measles Ball plays as compared to the Red Circle. I noticed the difference at the US 1Pocket Open last year. It was the first event I had ever played in with the MB, so I practiced with one in the weeks leading up to the event and right off I could tell there was a difference. After a couple of weeks playing with just the MB, I then played with a RC and it was like night and day. YMMV.
Yeah, I just don't understand how experienced players can feel that the two balls don't play differently.

I remember a post here a while back saying that Efren hated the way the measles CB plays.
 

TheBook

Ret Professional Goof Off
Silver Member
.


To compare 2 balls build a ramp using 2 shafts. They can be elevated a little by resting the butt ends on the short rail. Place a OB about 3 or 4 inches from the tips of those shafts. Now put the CB that you are testing on the shafts at the top. Let it free roll down the shafts striking the OB. Mark where the OB stops. Do a few trials. If the CB are the same the OB should stop in the same place. It helps if you spread the shafts a little at the tip end so the CB rolls onto the table without bouncing.


You can be creative and try rolling a OB into the CB. Freezing 2 balls together at the bottom of the ramp and etc trying different experiments. You need to use 2 shafts that have the same taper. 2 short straight boards, strips of wood, etc if available would give better results because of a better roll.



.

.
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lots of people have the same problem with the measel that McCready had: they don't know which dot to hit.

Once they figure out which dot is the appropriate one for a given shot, its automatic with the measle...an advantage over the no-dotter.
 

Baxter

Out To Win
Silver Member
I agree that they play different. I can also move the red circle around a little bit easier. I also believe that both balls play better than a black circle cueball, or the cueball with the red Aramith logo. The red logo ball is the worst one made by Aramith in my opinion.
 
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