Saw Stop

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I used to read all the woodworking magazines from cover to cover 15 years ago. When this technology came out then, the inventor was trying to sell it to the existing table saw manufacturers. They wanted nothing to do with it. So he had to create his own saw company as well, in order to get the new technology on the market.

Now, I think anyone who is in the market for a $1K plus table saw would be absolutely foolish not to get this saw. And any company that employees people and does not get this saw is especially foolish.
 

Tiddler

AzB Silver Haired Member
Silver Member
i was wondering if anyone had one or knew how much and where to get one?
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There are two models of this saw. A contractors model for about 1500, and a cabinet saw for about 3200. In comparison, a Delta Unisaw or a Powermatic 66 are just a few hundred dollars less.

Besides the sawstop feature, the saw itself competes with the two above competitors in every other area quite nicely. About its only downside is its not made in the US, like the other two companies are (their cabinet models only).
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I bought a Delta cabinet saw 20 yrs ago, before this came out. I would definitely buy this today.

My woodworking friend just bought the cabinet model last year, and absolutely loves it. He never tripped the safety feature. He loves the saw for its everyday use and design. I'm sure if he ever does trip the safety feature it will be even higher up on his list of best purchases ever.
 

Tiddler

AzB Silver Haired Member
Silver Member
Well, I read an article saying the base model should come out at $699, but now that I've looked around they've added another grand or more to that price.
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
I used to read all the woodworking magazines from cover to cover 15 years ago. When this technology came out then, the inventor was trying to sell it to the existing table saw manufacturers. They wanted nothing to do with it. So he had to create his own saw company as well, in order to get the new technology on the market.

Now, I think anyone who is in the market for a $1K plus table saw would be absolutely foolish not to get this saw. And any company that employees people and does not get this saw is especially foolish.


I agree with you, its nothing more than a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) you see in electrical outlets and cords....but for safety against being cut as opposed to shocked to death.


This is one of the most helpful, useful and protective products I've ever seen.

Accidents happen to even the most skilled craftsman, and especially when it comes to your hands and being functional....whats it cost to sew a finger back on? $20k?

Or kids of the crafty kind find a way in your shop turn on the machine and cut their hands off! STUPID KIDS.....now you can protect fools from themselves.

Apparantly this has been around for some time (escapes me why i've never heard of this) once all the construction type business purchase them no one will lose appendages or have to sue....until one ahole keeps "TESTING" the machine, eventually resulting in a sensor malfunction and ZERRRRRRRRRR there goes manuel's 4 fingers....then they are going to blame the machine....and it will be no more once the lawyers and politicians are done with it.
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
The lowest price I've seen has been a sale at Woodcraft for $1300 once. It is a one time trip device, that can cost as much as $150 to replace and continue. It is a great idea, but as usuall, corporate needs to get paid to offer it to us. I had a saw incident 4 yrs ago that, luckily I still have the three fingers minus some bone. This saw would have prevented it, but I couldn't afford it if it was availible at that time. Maybe Obama/or liberals can include a reimburstment for the purchase of this saw and attach it to the heathcare law......:thumbup:Save alot of hospital bills for the working class.
Dave
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The lowest price I've seen has been a sale at Woodcraft for $1300 once. It is a one time trip device, that can cost as much as $150 to replace and continue. It is a great idea, but as usuall, corporate needs to get paid to offer it to us. I had a saw incident 4 yrs ago that, luckily I still have the three fingers minus some bone. This saw would have prevented it, but I couldn't afford it if it was availible at that time. Maybe Obama/or liberals can include a reimburstment for the purchase of this saw and attach it to the heathcare law......:thumbup:Save alot of hospital bills for the working class.
Dave

Years ago when I was at Zeiler's house, I heard him scream while I was fixing his computer.
He was taking the corners of a purpleheart square. The blade hit a knot and it was grinding. Z pushed it and the tumbled taking his left hand ( he had a push stick ).
The blade cut-off part his left pinky and a few cartilage and bones from the other fingers.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
From a purely financial perspective, Sawstop provides costs associated per average hospital bill for cut off fingers. They have this info specifically for corporations, to prove to them its cost effective to buy the saw. The sheets I saw were something like 40K for a finger cut off. The saw costs 3200 in cabinet form, and about 1500 in contractor saw form. Again, this is what you would pay anyway if you were a serious woodworker hobbiest or had a business in the woodworking field, or a school, or a corporation with an R&D department.

This isn't intended for the guy that buys the junk 100 sears benchtop saw.
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
Here is an interesting article about a lawsuit in which Sawstop came in for the plaintiff, and now seems ready to force their device into every saw by participating in lawsuits against companies that have refused to buy and incorperate their device into the product. I'm not so comfortable about that. http://www.woodshopnews.com/news/news-desk/498930-table-saw-suit-nets-15m-verdict
I'm all for safty, but people still need to act responsible around equipment of this type and take responsibility for their actions when things don't go right. My accident happened mainly because I #1 removed the safety guard to notch a board, and #2 I didn't use a pushstick. It was all my fault, so how can I sue the manufacturer?
Dave
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Here is an interesting article about a lawsuit in which Sawstop came in for the plaintiff, and now seems ready to force their device into every saw by participating in lawsuits against companies that have refused to buy and incorperate their device into the product. I'm not so comfortable about that. http://www.woodshopnews.com/news/news-desk/498930-table-saw-suit-nets-15m-verdict
I'm all for safty, but people still need to act responsible around equipment of this type and take responsibility for their actions when things don't go right. My accident happened mainly because I #1 removed the safety guard to notch a board, and #2 I didn't use a pushstick. It was all my fault, so how can I sue the manufacturer?
Dave

Just pour hot coffee on your lap and sue Mcd's.
 

Craig Fales

Registered bubinga user
Silver Member
Years ago when I was at Zeiler's house, I heard him scream while I was fixing his computer.
He was taking the corners of a purpleheart square. The blade hit a knot and it was grinding. Z pushed it and the tumbled taking his left hand ( he had a push stick ).
The blade cut-off part his left pinky and a few cartilage and bones from the other fingers.

Always use a bandsaw for knocking corners off.
 

Craig Fales

Registered bubinga user
Silver Member
Here is an interesting article about a lawsuit in which Sawstop came in for the plaintiff, and now seems ready to force their device into every saw by participating in lawsuits against companies that have refused to buy and incorperate their device into the product. I'm not so comfortable about that. http://www.woodshopnews.com/news/news-desk/498930-table-saw-suit-nets-15m-verdict
I'm all for safty, but people still need to act responsible around equipment of this type and take responsibility for their actions when things don't go right. My accident happened mainly because I #1 removed the safety guard to notch a board, and #2 I didn't use a pushstick. It was all my fault, so how can I sue the manufacturer?
Dave

I hear you with person responsibility. On saws of any kind my #1 rule is to never have any thing in the path of the blade I don't want cut off. Featherboards and pressure rollers are the best things ever, all you have to do is push in a straight line and keep your eye on the blade.
 
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