Cleaning a Shaft

subdude1974

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
What is the best way to clean a shaft each you get finished shooting? Get rid of sweat, oils, chalk etc... I need some help. Thanks.
 

Dartman

Pro Billiards
Silver Member
Your going to get plenty of different answers on this one. Personally I keep a piece of 0000 steel wool in the case and use it during and after play. It does a good job of keeping the shaft slick and clean.
 

Drew

Got a little dog in you?
Silver Member
PKM said:
Q-wiz does the trick for me.

Yeah I like the q-wiz. But it does tend to turn my shaft blue. I didn't like that at first, but now I love the chalky shaft.
 

McChen

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i use a mr. clean magic eraser damped with rubbing alcohol. it will clean DEEP into the shaft
 

chilli66

the chilli is back!
Silver Member
I'll second the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser, although I've only used it with water. Cleans the shaft very quickly indeed!
 

PKM

OB-1 Kenobi
Silver Member
Drew said:
Yeah I like the q-wiz. But it does tend to turn my shaft blue. I didn't like that at first, but now I love the chalky shaft.

Well, it's not that it turns it blue, it just doesn't remove all of the chalk. It just takes off some of the excess and probably some of the random gunk that builds up.
 

ccn7

Ole Pool Fool
Silver Member
I like to use Mr. Clean Magic Eraser, i use it dry.

For a more effective, yet more involved method of cleaning your pool cue shaft, you can use a pool cue smoother and a pool cue burnisher. These are generally considered the most effective mode of pool cue shaft care. You begin by wrapping the smoother fully around the shaft, and continue by stroking the shaft gently. The trick here is ensure that too much pressure is not applied, as there is the risk of producing unwanted heat through the friction that could be generated. Finish only once you have reached the desired smoothness is achieved.

Once you have smoothed to cue shaft perfection, you follow this up with burnishing. Burnishing involves the wrapping of burnishing leather around the newly smoothed pool cue shaft. You then proceed to stroke the shaft with rapid motion, but this time, moderate pressure is to be applied. Once this is complete, follow it up with another final smoothing. Finish it off with a final polish, using either a polishing glove or a cotton cloth.

If you do prefer burnishing paper, you can't go wrong with Q Smooth. Each packet of Q Smooth includes 14 fingertip slips of micro-fine ceramic beadsQ Smooth Shaft Burnishing Paper firmly bonded on quality 3 mil. polyester film: 2 white (medium-fine) slips for smoothing rough or hardwood shafts; 4 blue (fine) slips for smoothing normal cue shafts; 4 green (very fine) slips for burnishing the shaft; and 4 yellow (micro-fine) slips for giving your shaft its final polish. Q Smooth will not scratch or damage cue shafts. The slips are washable and reusable and are quick and easy to use.

All above information was obtained off the net.
 

JimS

Grandpa & his grand boys.
Silver Member
I wipe with a damp towel after each inning and then dry immediately. When I get done for the day I clean with a Magic Eraser dampened with alcohol or water, then dry it and then burnish with leather.
 

Sensation

right there
Silver Member
One of the best way to clean it deep:

-Magic Eraser (ME) dampened with denaturated alcohol (99,9% alcohol).
-Get rid of the ME particles by washing with a cotton cloth (or paper towel) dampened with lighter fluid or denaturated alcohol.
-Grain of the wood will be raised. Sand it lightly with 1200 grit sandpaper and over (I personally finish with 1500 and 2000). Going slowly with the paper and turning constantly the shaft (tip turning on a table per example).
-Pass a dry cotton cloth on the shaft to wash the wood particles.
-Burnish with a leather piece or a piece of paper bag. Briskly. You want heat.

Now, it's clean!
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dartman said:
Your going to get plenty of different answers on this one. Personally I keep a piece of 0000 steel wool in the case and use it during and after play. It does a good job of keeping the shaft slick and clean.
I would caution against steel wool, the fibers can shed and embed themselves in the wood (not noticable until they turn orange from rust). Also, steel wool has a light coat of oil to help prevent rusting that is being rubbed into the wood.
Chuck
 

Steve - Detroit

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
zippo or ronsonol lighter fluid on a cotton swab. doesn't raise the grain or dry out the wood like alcohol. after that, a piece of leather.
 

JimS

Grandpa & his grand boys.
Silver Member
Steve - Detroit said:
zippo or ronsonol lighter fluid on a cotton swab. doesn't raise the grain or dry out the wood like alcohol. after that, a piece of leather.

I used to use lighter fluid. Don't know why I switched. Makes sense that the alcohol would dry out the wood.... I think.
 

Hutchfish

Registered
I use a product designed to clean the fine wood on gunstocks without damagng or marring. It's called "Stock Sheen & Conditioner" made by Birchwood/Casey and it comes in 3 oz. bottles. I have found it to only be available at higher end gun shops...and even then, they've had to order it in. The last bottle I bought has lasted me 3+ years and I still have plenty left, so it's very economical.

It is a white milky semi-thick liquid that you apply to a clean terrycloth towel. Gently rub the stuff on the shaft with the towel in 3"-4" sections. You won't believe how much gunk it will remove!!!!! It is absolutely non-abrasive and actually helps to condition the wood as it cleans. I have used it on old shafts and made them literally look fresh off the cue lathe!!! But please note, you do not want to use it on any part of the cue that is finished, only use on the un-finished part of the shaft.

After cleaning, I wrap a fresh clean terrycloth towel around the shaft and work it with pressure until I can start to feel a little heat. And it does wonders for cleaning chalk off of your ferrule too!

Right or wrong, this is what has worked for me the past twenty years or so. I learned of this stuff from an old gunmaker who also happened to shoot a little pool every now and then.
 

mooseman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
1. Magic Eraser with Denatured Alcohol

2. Teflon Spray

3. Burnish with micromesh pads 4000 up. Micomesh is reusable and is used for polishing woods as needed. Of course the higher grades of wet and dry can be used. I've used the headlight polishing papers from a kit I had as well. Last but not least I've been meaning to try the papers used for polishing fiber connectors. They are probably similar to the QWiz papers/film mentioned above.
 

Dartman

Pro Billiards
Silver Member
RiverCity said:
I would caution against steel wool, the fibers can shed and embed themselves in the wood (not noticable until they turn orange from rust). Also, steel wool has a light coat of oil to help prevent rusting that is being rubbed into the wood. Chuck

I've used 0000 on the same 2 cues since I got them in 1996 with no problem. When the shafts start to feel a little dry I burnish them with a piece of leather picked up from Tiger products. Call me old school but it works for me.
 

mark8950

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
clean shaft

try damp rag with a little bit of lemon juice. will dry fast a nd the juice takes out all the grease grime etc. for slick shaft without using steel wool, use a bar glass ashtray- simply put the ashtray against the shaft and go up and down just like using steel wool. u be sutprised how clean and smooth ur shaft will be. sparky
 

cuejoey

25 mm chain guns matter
Silver Member
RiverCity said:
I would caution against steel wool, the fibers can shed and embed themselves in the wood (not noticable until they turn orange from rust). Also, steel wool has a light coat of oil to help prevent rusting that is being rubbed into the wood.
Chuck
i agree DO NOT to use steel wool..go to a hardware store,Menards,Homedepot ect.get the scott or 3M sanding pads..they come in various gritts.they are the size of a sheet of sandpaper and are about 1/4 inch thick..they are color coded to grit ..
 

Fatboy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
wow all these abrasive cleaners, over time no matter how careful anyone is your shaft will get thinner, its just cutting a layer off the wood, if yoou dont move balls except with your ferrel you wont have many dings to worrie about, if a shaft is properly burnished it will get dark with oils, chalk etc and fill the pours of the wood and thats a good thing, burnish that to a mirror finish-dont sand it off and you'll have a good shaft, they last for ever if properly treated, i screwed up unough shafts with pads, 0000 steel wool, 600 grit paper, until i realized 2 things donr ding your shaft, dont get it wet, all the wood stands up and it gets rough and then you sand it down, wash your hands often when you play, but keep the shaft dry, dont eat french fries and play pool!!! grease on a shaft is death and then yes it does need to be sanded, hand oils dont. let it get glazed over with the above mentioned stuff(chalk, talc, hand oils) and burnish it with a well worn piece of leather, stop grinding your shafts down!! and only move balls with the ferrel. i'm knot trying to make enimys here only talking from experience and believe me i ground up alot of shafts til i got it right

if the cue falls and gets a dent, then soak it out. thats a different thread.
 
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