DCC BETTER THEN OR NOW?

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I just posted elsewhere about the DCC and did not want to derail a thread, thus this thread. In 2006, I made my one and only pilgrimage to the DCC. I definitely wanted to return, and even started making plans to return a couple of years later, but they had moved to a casino in Indiana . . . and I decided that I would wait and see what developed. In the meantime, I went to Tunica (much shorter drive) but did not go back. The reports coming back from Indiana were not great -- long walks, food issues, etc. I never got a settled report on non-casino gambling. I would bet that DCC is still the greatest thing since sliced bread, but I get the idea it lost a great deal in the move. Lately, I read something about a 21 year old age limit. So what's the deal now? Why did the DCC leave the Executive West in the first place?
 
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Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
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Biloxi Boy...That's easy. The Executive West was sold, and the new owners did not want to be associated with a pool tournament. Therefore Greg Sullivan had to find a suitable replacement. There was nothing in Louisville that fit the bill, and would work with Greg. Consequently the move to Ceasars 20 miles away. The remodel of the casino, bringing it 'in-house', as opposed to off-site on the boat, meant that the 21 age limit had to be put in place. That was a terrible travesty, as the DCC has always been a place for young people to show off their table skills, in the tournament and on the gambling tables. I love the DCC, and have been several times for the whole 9 days! I don't think it will happen this coming January. Too much Covid-19 interference.

Scott Lee
2019 PBIA Instructor of the Year
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I loved it too and was also there for 9 days. I want to go back, but I do not want to chase a ghost, either -- its a long drive and huge investment of money and time. I have lived around and worked with regulated gaming for almost 30 years, and I know how anal regulators can be. I cannot imagine any state Gaming Commission allowing wide-open gambling (a la DCC in Louisville) on a regulated site -- especially if they are getting their panties kinked over a 19 year old just playing in a tournament. Tunica was definitely not up to DCC standards in any respect. I also remember Grady flipping out every time a deck of cards appeared in unregulated hands in Gulfport. My analysis is that DCC can never be what it was if a state Gaming Commission is looking over its shoulder.
 

iusedtoberich

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I've only been to the DCC at the new location. I think I went 4 times. There was gambling non-stop each time. The gaming commission didn't bother anyone that I saw, or stop/prevent any games from happening that I saw.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
The DCC took a giant step forward when it moved to the Horseshoe after the 2008 event. Originally, it was just nine ball, one pocket and banks, but in 2009 the Straight Pool Challenge was added, and so was the ten ball event now known as the Bigfoot. In addition, there are three more events, each of them 64 player single elimination, beginning at midnight during this nine day festival of pool: a) the bank pool midnight mini, b) the one pocket midnight mini, and c) the nine ball midnight mini. The core events at the Horseshoe draw more than twice as many players as they did at the old venue, too.
More than a few contend that the action was better at the original location, but in nearly all respects, the event at the Horseshoe gives the old event the seven.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
Part of the whole deal in Louisville was the carnival-like, hands-off, anything goes atmosphere, that pervaded the Executive West. It reminded me a lot of Mardi Gras in New Orleans, late 60's/early 70's. The organized events are one thing, but, in my experience, its what goes on off of the tournament floor that puts things over the top. If it is still like that, then I need to pack my bag and gas up the truck. My problem is that I have yet to hear, from anyone, that the Gaming Commission has allowed gambling to roll and that the same free wheeling atmosphere exists. One can have all of the organized events in the world, but it is the disorganized stuff that makes it a party. That's all I am saying -- all I am looking for.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
Part of the whole deal in Louisville was the carnival-like, hands-off, anything goes atmosphere, that pervaded the Executive West. It reminded me a lot of Mardi Gras in New Orleans, late 60's/early 70's. The organized events are one thing, but, in my experience, its what goes on off of the tournament floor that puts things over the top. If it is still like that, then I need to pack my bag and gas up the truck. My problem is that I have yet to hear, from anyone, that the Gaming Commission has allowed gambling to roll and that the same free wheeling atmosphere exists. One can have all of the organized events in the world, but it is the disorganized stuff that makes it a party. That's all I am saying -- all I am looking for.
Sounds to me that you'd have more fun at the Mosconi Cup in Vegas than at the DCC. The pool itself, played only in the afternoon to coincide with prime time TV in the UK, is over by dinner time every day and you'll have all your evenings free. There's a party like atmosphere in the evenings. Whether you choose to sweat the action at the local pool rooms, go to the casinos, hang out at the bars with the pool crowd, or just socialize with others over a meal or anything else, you'll never run out of things to do in Vegas.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I live in a 24/7/365 gaming town, and I grew up in a no holds barred gambling town, always only an hour and a half from New Orleans -- Vegas holds very little allure for me. I am afraid that DCC/Louisville was one of those "special time, special place" events, not to be repeated, not unlike Johnston City. If so, then RIP, and I am happy to have made the scene when I did. There will be more. I just hope I make some of the next one. An old gambler once told me, "the secret of gambling is to recognize what's happening as it's happening" -- a very difficult, and very true, proposition, if you think about it.
 

Bob Jewett

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The DCC took a giant step forward when it moved to the Horseshoe after the 2008 event. Originally, it was just nine ball, one pocket and banks, but in 2009 the Straight Pool Challenge was added, ...
A small nit here.... The straight pool started in 2006 at Executive West. Danny Harriman had the overall high run with 139 and Thomas Engert had the high run in the finals with a 128 followed by Corey Deuel at 121.

In 2008 Darren Appleton won the finals (a tournament for the first time) and Allison Fisher won the women's division (first and only time for two divisions).

I think the most notable part of the 2009 DCC was the ice storm.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
A small nit here.... The straight pool started in 2006 at Executive West. Danny Harriman had the overall high run with 139 and Thomas Engert had the high run in the finals with a 128 followed by Corey Deuel at 121.

In 2008 Darren Appleton won the finals (a tournament for the first time) and Allison Fisher won the women's division (first and only time for two divisions).

I think the most notable part of the 2009 DCC was the ice storm.
Thanks for the correction. I did not realize this. Yup, remember that ice storm. I had rented a car that week, and other than to and from Louisville airport, I didn't use it even once. I never rented a car again during Derby week.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I thought I remembered a straight pool challenge when I was there -- in a side room off a hall -- but if I recall correctly, I kept checking it out but never found anything going on. I want to say there was some buzz about Thorsten Hohmann in connection with it.
 

Bob Jewett

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I thought I remembered a straight pool challenge when I was there -- in a side room off a hall -- but if I recall correctly, I kept checking it out but never found anything going on. I want to say there was some buzz about Thorsten Hohmann in connection with it.
In 2006 the straight pool challenge was in the Redwood Room (IIRC) which was off the hall and next to the buffet. Thorsten didn't enter the first year, but did play the next (2007) when I believe it was moved to The Chapel, which was off the main room.

I think the Executive West had a lot more room and the neighboring Executive East had additional room for the amateur players. The buffet got old pretty quickly but other restaurants were fairly near.
 

spktur

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've been to all but about three of the Derby events and there is no comparison between the Executive West events and the Horseshoe events. The Executive West was by far a better event but they chose not to have it after the sale so it doesn't matter what anyone thinks it had to move.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
Speaking of the Derby, wonder whether the 2021 edition will happen on schedule.

There are several issues involved including the event producers getting the go-ahead from the state of Indiana for a large gathering, interstate travel advisories and associated testing and quarantining requirements (which will vary based on the states from which and to which attendees will travel), and the extent to which personal protective equipment will be mandated at the event itself.

Whatever decision Diamond Billiards makes will be the right one, but I sure hope they can pull this off. It won't be easy.
 

JCIN

TheActionReport.com
Gold Member
I live in a 24/7/365 gaming town, and I grew up in a no holds barred gambling town, always only an hour and a half from New Orleans -- Vegas holds very little allure for me. I am afraid that DCC/Louisville was one of those "special time, special place" events, not to be repeated, not unlike Johnston City. If so, then RIP, and I am happy to have made the scene when I did. There will be more. I just hope I make some of the next one. An old gambler once told me, "the secret of gambling is to recognize what's happening as it's happening" -- a very difficult, and very true, proposition, if you think about it.
IMO the Executive West years are exactly what Johnston City was. That was Greg's vision for it and he made it happen. I feel lucky to have seen something that will never happen again. The world is different now.

Those early years were one of those perfect intersections of time, place and people to create something unique. It wasn't all roses but it was special.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
It was my first night in Louisville, and there was very mixed crowd in the action room (bar) and there was a much wolfing etc., and the three card monte dealer was giving it everything he had -- very deftly. From frat boy types to inner of inner city boyz, everyone was checking the others out. Eventually, someone says,
"I'll bet anything on a coin flip"
and all hell broke loose from all sides. A pair of young hustlers was pushing the bet hard. Finally, an older, lanky dude, seemingly from out west, says,
"Okay, I'm in for a $1,000.00."
One of the young guns says,
"Okay, but I get to call it in the air, and the flip lands on the floor."
The crowd parted, money posted, coin goes up, the call comes,
"Heads on the floor"
and the coin is down: tails up. The lanky guy attempts to collect, but the young guy stops him, saying,
"I won, I won -- heads is on the floor".
Eventually, the two young cats get paid, the crowd quiets some, more propositions exchanged, but a pall has been cast on the evening. Then, the lanky guy says slowly, very evenly,
"That was a stone cold hustle, and I want my money back"
and all hell breaks loose again
"I said heads on the floor, heads was on the floor . . ."
Then I hear something to the effect of, again slowly, very evenly,
"I don't know if you fellows mean to stay all week, but if you don't give me my money back, you best clear out now, because I am going to be here all week".
The young dude, somewhat chagrined, owns up and gives the money back. Now, all hell really breaks loose -- the quiet one of the pair is in his partner's face,
"You #$%&@(&, what are doing? We have waited years to make that . . ."
I never saw the two again after that night, but the tall cat was there for the rest of the week.
 
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Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My first night in Louisville and a very mixed crowd was in the action room (bar) and there was a much wolfing etc., and the three card monte dealer was giving it everything he had -- very deftly. Eventually someone says,
"I'll bet anything on a coin flip"
and all hell broke loose from all sides. A pair of two young hustlers were pushing the bet hard. Finally, an older, lanky dude, seemingly from out west, says,
"Okay, I'm in for a $1,000.00."
One of the young guns says,
"Okay, but I get to call it in the air, and the flip lands on the floor."
The crowd parted, money posted, coin goes up, the call comes,
"Heads on the floor"
and the coin lands, tails up. So the lanky guy goes to collect, but the young guy says,
"I won, I won -- heads is on the floor".
Eventually, the two young cats get paid, the crowd quiets some, more propositions exchanged, but a pall has been cast on the evening. Then, the lanky guy says slowly, very evenly,
"That was a stone cold hustle, and I want my money back"
and all hell breaks loose again
"I said heads on the floor, heads was on the floor . . ."
Then we hear something to the effect of, again slowly, very evenly
"I don't know if you fellows mean to stay all week, but if you don't give me my money back, you best clear out now, because I am going to be here all week"
and the young dude owns up and gives the money back. Now, all hell really breaks loose -- the quiet one of the pair is in his partner's face,
"You #$%&@(&, what are doing? We have waited years to make that . . ."
I never saw the two again after that night, but the tall cat was there for the rest of the week.
New york and arizona. Best pair to ever disregard the 10 day extended forecast.
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just posted elsewhere about the DCC and did not want to derail a thread, thus this thread. In 2006, I made my one and only pilgrimage to the DCC. I definitely wanted to return, and even started making plans to return a couple of years later, but they had moved to a casino in Indiana . . . and I decided that I would wait and see what developed. In the meantime, I went to Tunica once (much shorter drive) but did not go back. The reports coming back from Indiana were not great -- long walks, food issues, etc. I never got a settled report on non-casino gambling. I would bet that DCC is still the greatest thing since sliced bread, but I get the idea it lost a great deal in the move. Lately, I read something about a 21 year old age limit. So what's the deal now? Why did the DCC leave the Executive West in the first place?

In spite of what anyone might say about the EW being a bit old fashion in decor, and perhaps a bit worn down about the edges, it had a charm that somehow seemed just right for a pool jamboree.

The tournament room with the vaulted ceiling and the chapel alcove with its stained glass; the walk upstairs to the Cooney - Walden tournament room; the roasted nut vendor and massage station by the the stairs; the walk down the long hallway filled with vendors, the office, cue mechanics, the guy doing the magic tricks; the separate small rooms for more cue and gimcrack displays; the action room; and the Drinkwater Room with the two challenge tables; and well: with all the little nooks and crannies and dark wood, it had atmosphere and a certain je ne sais qua. I also like the platforms that provided elevated seating for spectators, the bar with the free but too salty popcorn, and the working girls who cruised the tournament room

And, after 10 years, it had tradition going for it. RIP the DCC at the EW.

Lou Figueroa
 
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