Floor Reinforcement for Table

Ant812

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i am moving into a new house in 2 weeks. i am bringing with me an 8' olhausen grand champion pro which weighs 1100 lbs according to olhausen. during the home inspection, after informing the inspector i would be putting the table in the living room, he strongly suggested i reinforce the floor. i have had this table in a living room setting for the past 5 years with no issues whatsoever. im just wondering if any of you have done this to accomadate a table. floor in question is built with 2 x 10"s spaced at 16". i would say the span from the basement wall to the steel center beam is about 12-14'.
 

cuesmith

BEEN THERE, DONE THAT!
Silver Member
i am moving into a new house in 2 weeks. i am bringing with me an 8' olhausen grand champion pro which weighs 1100 lbs according to olhausen. during the home inspection, after informing the inspector i would be putting the table in the living room, he strongly suggested i reinforce the floor. i have had this table in a living room setting for the past 5 years with no issues whatsoever. im just wondering if any of you have done this to accomadate a table. floor in question is built with 2 x 10"s spaced at 16". i would say the span from the basement wall to the steel center beam is about 12-14'.

I'd say the inspector was covering his ass. It's my opinion that it should be fine.
 

Johnnyt

Burn all jump cues
Silver Member
i am moving into a new house in 2 weeks. i am bringing with me an 8' olhausen grand champion pro which weighs 1100 lbs according to olhausen. during the home inspection, after informing the inspector i would be putting the table in the living room, he strongly suggested i reinforce the floor. i have had this table in a living room setting for the past 5 years with no issues whatsoever. im just wondering if any of you have done this to accomadate a table. floor in question is built with 2 x 10"s spaced at 16". i would say the span from the basement wall to the steel center beam is about 12-14'.

A lot of these inspectors are front men for terminator, building, and other companies that they get a kick-back from if they send biz their way. Get another opinion from someone else that you or family can trust. Johnnyt
 

Tbeaux

Angelic Hotdog
Silver Member
He may have been familiar with pool and was just advising reinforcement to prevent settling of the floor.
 

junkbond

The dog ate my stroke.
Silver Member
Before my Gold Crown was installed, I had the floors reinforced. The floor joists are 2x10, 12" on center. The added rigidity was very noticable even just walking across the room. The table has been in for a year now, and remains rock solid. It's probably best if you have the floor reinforced.
This thread shows a picture of the reinforcement under my floor.

-Howard
 

Ant812

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
thanks guys, the inspector would not reccomend anyone, its against their policy. however, he did suggest having the floor reinforced with sister joists. these would be 2 x 10's bolted onto the existing joists. some may be able to sit on top of the wall and beam, and some may not because of ductwork, wiring, etc... i may just do it for piece of mind.
junkbond, hat looks great. unfortuanatley i cant go that way, the floor is over a basement which i plan on using so i dont want to add any more poles.
 

Cue Guru

Close, but no roll...
Silver Member
I think sistering the joists is a good idea.

Nothing worse than getting it all leveled perfect and then you hear the 'crack' at 2:00AM as one of the joists splits at a knot...:boring2::eek:

Now you have to remove the table, jack the house, sister it all anyway, and then re-set up and level the table.:rolleyes:

Spend the extra ~$100.00 for lumber now and do it yourself.:)
 

timm

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You can reinforce it if you like to take out some of the bounce, but the floor is plenty strong enough to hold the table. That is just like having 6 average sized guys standing in the middle of the floor. Would that worry you?
 

Tbeaux

Angelic Hotdog
Silver Member
You can reinforce it if you like to take out some of the bounce, but the floor is plenty strong enough to hold the table. That is just like having 6 average sized guys standing in the middle of the floor. Would that worry you?

24/7/365/year/year in year out................................YES!
Don't those six guys got somewhere else to call home.:grin:
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You can reinforce it if you like to take out some of the bounce, but the floor is plenty strong enough to hold the table. That is just like having 6 average sized guys standing in the middle of the floor. Would that worry you?
24/7/365/year/year in year out................................YES!
Don't those six guys got somewhere else to call home.:grin:
And...depends on if they wanna play pool there or not!
 

cuesmith

BEEN THERE, DONE THAT!
Silver Member
24/7/365/year/year in year out................................YES!
Don't those six guys got somewhere else to call home.:grin:

I'm sure my king size water bed weighs more than my 9' Diamond. The water bed has been in place for over 15 years on the same type floor construction you're describing and has never caused a problem. I also discussed this with my buddy who like myself owned a pool table service company. In our combined years of experience approaching 40 years, neither of us has ever heard of anyone's floor giving out or any of the 2X10's breaking. That's not to say that there might not be a certain amount of settling which could require re-leveling after a month or so, but the floor should hold the weight without any problems.
 

Ant812

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm sure my king size water bed weighs more than my 9' Diamond. The water bed has been in place for over 15 years on the same type floor construction you're describing and has never caused a problem. I also discussed this with my buddy who like myself owned a pool table service company. In our combined years of experience approaching 40 years, neither of us has ever heard of anyone's floor giving out or any of the 2X10's breaking. That's not to say that there might not be a certain amount of settling which could require re-leveling after a month or so, but the floor should hold the weight without any problems.

yes, i totally agree, im not worried about it giving out, just concerned about it sagging in the center. i been doing some research on the internet, and the floor would be rated at 40 lbs per square foot. a pool table is more than that considering the base is smaller than the top. without measuring, im guessing the base is approximately 3 x 6 which would be 18 square feet. divide that into 1100 lbs and its about 60 lbs per square. the inspector did say it would take a long time, but if i can easily prevent it, it would probably all be for the better.
 

s'portplayer

Midnight Rambler
Silver Member
I would rather be safe that sorry.

Go ahead a spend a lil dough now and ensure there won't be any sagging problems down the road.

I know it would aggravate me to no end, if I had to re-level a table on a regular basis.
 

Mikjary

Droppin' a Fauci
Silver Member
i am moving into a new house in 2 weeks. i am bringing with me an 8' olhausen grand champion pro which weighs 1100 lbs according to olhausen. during the home inspection, after informing the inspector i would be putting the table in the living room, he strongly suggested i reinforce the floor. i have had this table in a living room setting for the past 5 years with no issues whatsoever. im just wondering if any of you have done this to accomadate a table. floor in question is built with 2 x 10"s spaced at 16". i would say the span from the basement wall to the steel center beam is about 12-14'.

The only problem you could have is if it's an older home and the floor joists are not sitting on solid bearing points. It sounds like a newer home with the steel beam, so check for water or termite damage at the sill plate at the foundation. If that's okay you have no problem. If you do any work to it you're doing unnecessary surgery...unless you need me to do it for you. I'm a contractor and I'd be glad to do it for too much money. :rolleyes:

Best,
Mike
 

s'portplayer

Midnight Rambler
Silver Member
yes, i totally agree, im not worried about it giving out, just concerned about it sagging in the center. i been doing some research on the internet, and the floor would be rated at 40 lbs per square foot. a pool table is more than that considering the base is smaller than the top. without measuring, im guessing the base is approximately 3 x 6 which would be 18 square feet. divide that into 1100 lbs and its about 60 lbs per square. the inspector did say it would take a long time, but if i can easily prevent it, it would probably all be for the better.

Just remember, those 1100 lbs. are resting on four small casters and not a 3'x 6' solid base, so the weight is distributed much differently.
 

Tbeaux

Angelic Hotdog
Silver Member
Just remember, those 1100 lbs. are resting on four small casters and not a 3'x 6' solid base, so the weight is distributed much differently.

Very true. My grandmothers china cabinet sat for about 15 years in the same spot sitting on four feet and the floor sank about a 1/2".
 

phread59

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'd add blocking in between the joists. If the joists are 2x10's I would block them 1/3 of the way across the span on both sides. In other words measure thespan at 90 degrees to the span and divide by 3. That is the measurment from the wall. Basicly you cut boards to fit in between the joists to keep them from twisting. That should be enough to support your table. If you are really worried sister the current beams and sit them on a false wall to carry the load to the floor and block it. All simple easy to do things you can do yourself. Congrats on the new crib.

Mark Shuman
 

ridinda9

AKA: Sandy Bagger
Silver Member
So far all the talk has revolved around the joists and spacing . Not a word about the subfloors and floors themselves . That 1100 lbs spread out over 4 legs , each with a contact patch possibly as small as 3sq inches leads to a concentrated spot pressure of nearly 100pounds per square inch .
Now add in that NJ's temperate climate allows the windows to be open , exposing the floor to humidity , for several months a year, and you have a great potential for the flooring to warp between the joists , creating valleys.
You may wish to place the table to determine the placement of the legs , and then box/buttress their positions between the joists for extra strength .
 

Ant812

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
all great points i never would have considered. not sure about the floor and subfloor, its a newer house slightly larger than average and biult by a reputive builder. the other half of the floor (that is under the kitchen and family room have joists spaced at 12" anticipating for stone floors.
 
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