regulation size table

sammylane12

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I grew up playing in a small pool room with 7 old Brunswick tables built in the 1920`s. The playing surface on these old tables was 4.5'x9', that is 108" x 54". I am sure because I used to cover these tables for the owner. As we all know modern "regulation" tables now have a playing surface of 100" x 50". This is really a big difference. I remember the first time I played in a different pool hall I thought I was playing on 8 footers. Does anyone know when and why the playing surface dimentions were changed?
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
I grew up playing in a small pool room with 7 old Brunswick tables built in the 1920`s. The playing surface on these old tables was 4.5'x9', that is 108" x 54". I am sure because I used to cover these tables for the owner. As we all know modern "regulation" tables now have a playing surface of 100" x 50". This is really a big difference. I remember the first time I played in a different pool hall I thought I was playing on 8 footers. Does anyone know when and why the playing surface dimentions were changed?

Sorry...but 9ft pool tables as you've mentioned...have never existed in the past.
 

pdcue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I grew up playing in a small pool room with 7 old Brunswick tables built in the 1920`s. The playing surface on these old tables was 4.5'x9', that is 108" x 54". I am sure because I used to cover these tables for the owner. As we all know modern "regulation" tables now have a playing surface of 100" x 50". This is really a big difference. I remember the first time I played in a different pool hall I thought I was playing on 8 footers. Does anyone know when and why the playing surface dimentions were changed?

Playing surface is the measurement from cushion-nose to cushion-nose.

It has been 50 x 100 for a 4 1/2 x 9 for close to 200 years.

A 5 x 10 is 56 x 112.

Since you recovered the tables, perhaps you are recalling the
dimensions of the slate. 54 x 108 sounds about right, but I no longer
remember for sure.

If the crobra recovers any T-rail tables, he might know.
I suspect someone in the Mechanics section would.

Dale
 

Tony_in_MD

You want some of this?
Silver Member
I may be mistaken but I believe the term regulation pool table can apply to any size table as long as it is twice as long as it is wide.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk.
 

Pushout

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I may be mistaken but I believe the term regulation pool table can apply to any size table as long as it is twice as long as it is wide.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk.

"regulation" is one of the most misused terms in the pool world. You may be right but I doubt it. When I was learning to play regulation meant 4 1/2 x 9. Anything else was not considered regulation.
RKC??
 

sammylane12

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well it was 45 years ago. I guess my memory is not as good as it used to be. maybe I am thinking about the slate.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
I won a decent size bet once on table sizes.
We went to 4 rooms of 20 or more tables (with a tape measure)and I said he wouldn't be able to find one true 7-8-9-10 or 12 foot table.

..I won...:D
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I may be mistaken but I believe the term regulation pool table can apply to any size table as long as it is twice as long as it is wide.
"regulation" is one of the most misused terms in the pool world. You may be right but I doubt it. When I was learning to play regulation meant 4 1/2 x 9. Anything else was not considered regulation.
RKC??
I think Tony is 100% correct.
 

KCRack'em

I'm not argumentative!!!!
Silver Member
Then why...

Then why is a table a 9-foot table if the playing field isn't 9 feet? Or maybe it is ... place the cue in the jaws of a corner pocket and the object ball in the jaws of the opposite corner. If you measure you'll find that vertical distance, or the longest possible shot, is almost exactly 9 feet.
Karl
 

pdcue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Then why is a table a 9-foot table if the playing field isn't 9 feet? Or maybe it is ... place the cue in the jaws of a corner pocket and the object ball in the jaws of the opposite corner. If you measure you'll find that vertical distance, or the longest possible shot, is almost exactly 9 feet.
Karl

I suspect it is for the same reason that a 2 x 4 stud is not
2" x 4".

Dale(nominal describer)
 

DrGonzo

As your attorney...
Silver Member
In Mosconi's book, Willie's Game, he states that "regulation" tables were 5x10 in the most of the northern states and 4.5 x 9 in most of the southern states. The move was to go 4.5 x 9 for everything during the Depression, I believe, when he, Greanleaf, Caras, Ponzi, and others were going all over the country with their round robin tournaments.
 

Papa Red

Love it or Leave
Silver Member
When I was growing up I was told that you measure a table from the diamonds to get the size because this is how the diamond system works!
 

pdcue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In Mosconi's book, Willie's Game, he states that "regulation" tables were 5x10 in the most of the northern states and 4.5 x 9 in most of the southern states. The move was to go 4.5 x 9 for everything during the Depression, I believe, when he, Greanleaf, Caras, Ponzi, and others were going all over the country with their round robin tournaments.

According to Mosconi in "Willies' Game", the championship tournaments
were played on 5 x 10s untill 1950. The reason for the change was that
Brunswick no longer got any request to make 5 x 10 pool tables
except for the World Championship. I guess storing them between tournaments would have been out of the question.

Dale
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
I grew up playing in a small pool room with 7 old Brunswick tables built in the 1920`s. The playing surface on these old tables was 4.5'x9', that is 108" x 54". I am sure because I used to cover these tables for the owner. As we all know modern "regulation" tables now have a playing surface of 100" x 50". This is really a big difference. I remember the first time I played in a different pool hall I thought I was playing on 8 footers. Does anyone know when and why the playing surface dimentions were changed?

54"x108" would be the correct playing surface on a 10' table. Maybe those tables were 5'x10's. That would have been a common size in the 1920's.
 

TheBook

Ret Professional Goof Off
Silver Member
Then why is a table a 9-foot table if the playing field isn't 9 feet? Or maybe it is ... place the cue in the jaws of a corner pocket and the object ball in the jaws of the opposite corner. If you measure you'll find that vertical distance, or the longest possible shot, is almost exactly 9 feet.
Karl

That also explains why TV's are measured on the diagonal. The manufacturers started out building pool tables. :D




.
 

pdcue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
54"x108" would be the correct playing surface on a 10' table. Maybe those tables were 5'x10's. That would have been a common size in the 1920's.

Jay, you might want to "double check" (the procedure, not the pool game)
Sorry folks, inside red neck joke.

5 x 10s are 56 x 112 IIRC - and I'm pretty sure I do recall corectly.

Dale
 
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