The Biggest reason Lower level players can't improve ????

Tennesseejoe

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How do you approach folks with monocular vision? Such as those with only one eye?
 
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Jimmorrison

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Gene, I am very glad, to have made your acquaintance. The time, effort, and expense were well worth it. I appreciate the extra time you took. Shooting pool for 2+ hours, critiquing my game, making suggestions, answering questions, demonstrating those answers, really good stuff. All this after a four hour lesson, thank you! I barely even think about the shot line anymore, I just know I'm on it. I'm a little foggy on the fractional aiming part, and haven't added that to my game yet. Everything else we discussed, has been an immediate success.:thumbup:
 

Jimmorrison

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Why don't lower level players improve? The reasons are many and varied. Who are you, where do you live, what resources are available to you? It's a big leap to invest in a C level game. I would encourage almost anyone to take a lesson from Gene, no matter your level. Hard to imagine that you wouldn't learn something of value.
 

giulichajari

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In my city and also my country it always said the cue would be at the center of the head. I mean in the noose line. But i had seen a lot of international player with the cue parallel just to the right or left.
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
These players aim like they are shooting a gun.

In my city and also my country it always said the cue would be at the center of the head. I mean in the noose line. But i had seen a lot of international player with the cue parallel just to the right or left.

Players that shoot under one eye fit into 2 categories. Example is: If a player is naturally left eye dominant. Their natural eye dominance is slightly to the left of their nose. This might not even be able to be noticed by looking because of head tilt or just too close to see. Just slightly left eye dominant.

This player cannot go out directly under the left eye like a gun because it is too close to their natural eye dominance and this would fight this process from happening. Drifting from one way to the other.

But,,,,,They can get directly under the right eye like a gun because they can isolate that eye and it is further from their natural eye dominance. Under the right eye they can then shoot like they are shooting a gun.

The good things that happen from this is they are seeing the right and left side of the ball the same and they have no trouble getting to direct center of the cue ball.

This takes care of one of the problems being right eye dominant or left eye dominant. Left eye dominant players come down and naturally are a little or allot left of center and it looks like they are in the center tp themselves unless they keep the cue there once down and raise the head to see.

This is a big reason that players that shoot with only one eye, directly under on eye shoot so well immediately. They don't have both eyes kind of fighting for the dominant position.

So actually shooting with one eye is an advantage.
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If it works it will work right away..........

Gene, I am very glad, to have made your acquaintance. The time, effort, and expense were well worth it. I appreciate the extra time you took. Shooting pool for 2+ hours, critiquing my game, making suggestions, answering questions, demonstrating those answers, really good stuff. All this after a four hour lesson, thank you! I barely even think about the shot line anymore, I just know I'm on it. I'm a little foggy on the fractional aiming part, and haven't added that to my game yet. Everything else we discussed, has been an immediate success.:thumbup:

I always tell players that I teach that if something is going to work it will work for you right away.

First I show the player the problem that this dominant eye has created and then I show them how to fix it. The results are always off the charts.

Out of all the players telling about how it works, everyone is really happy what they learned and can see the results quickly.

Glad to see your results were good. The goal is to help you play better pool and enjoy the game to your fullest. Your on your way my friend.

Thanks for your great testimonial. Good Luck with your game my friend.
:thumbup:
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In my city and also my country it always said the cue would be at the center of the head. I mean in the noose line. But i had seen a lot of international player with the cue parallel just to the right or left.

I strive for central alignment. I think the biggest problem with this and pool aiming in general is dropping your cue vertically into a shot. All the joints involved hinge in directions unrelated to shooting pool. You see all manner of compensation from torso pivots, diagonal slashes, getting into firing position is truly technique intensive. Through my own experimentation with leaning over the cue or placing the cue outside your head, the primary function seems to be one of cue/stroke alignment and coherence with one's personal stance/cueball line.

I think the real visual issue is the cue is so close to your face that the eyes simply cannot focus on it and the cue ball. Some people do the Machino thing w/variations on toggling views from cueball to object ball etc...
I locate the stick/stroke line first and then I do the thing drunks do - and this might be the greatest wisdom in pool, ever; "Shoot the one in the middle."
 

jokrswylde

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Most players that get accidental left English are left eye dominant. When someone says this the first thing I check is which eye is the dominant eye for sure?

If a player is relying on the standard pointing and circle technique to identify the dominant eye it doesn't work all the time. 50/50. Like flipping a coin. Some swear by it and the rest aren't sure but might think they are.

Now if you have ocular vision and aim with one eye like a rifle, usually these players have no trouble getting and staying to center. They get right and left English equally for the most part.

This is very frustrating for me because, swear on everything, I can do the circle test or the hold the thumb out test and sometimes my right eye is dominant (i.e. the object does not move out of the circle when I close my left eye) and just as often the test shows that I have left eye dominance. Very frustrating indeed!
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Perfect example this test does not work.

This is very frustrating for me because, swear on everything, I can do the circle test or the hold the thumb out test and sometimes my right eye is dominant (i.e. the object does not move out of the circle when I close my left eye) and just as often the test shows that I have left eye dominance. Very frustrating indeed!

I had to find the dominant eye when I started on the road teaching and it was very frustrating for me also.

I would do the pointing and circle tests and it would say the player was right eye dominant but when they got down they would put the cue more under the left showing that they were actually left eye dominant.

If I could not find the players dominant eye I could not help them enhance their aim by manually getting in the most dominant position.

Having them move the wrong way would make things worse.

Finally I had enough. I went to 4 eye doctors and asked them if this eye dominance test was reliable. All 4 said yes.

Then I went to the 5 th one and he said it was a worthless test. I asked him how he knew. He said an old eye doctor that he knew years ago explained to him and showed him it didn't work. The further you are from what you are looking at the less eye dominance matters. When images get close is when our natural eye dominance becomes a factor.

I asked him why did these other eye doctors tell me it was reliable.

He replied; How many dominant eyes do they have to find to put a pair of glasses or contacts on your face. I thought about it for about 5 seconds and replied none.

He said exactly, so how are they any kind of an expert at finding the dominant eye.

So after going thru this for about 6 months on the road i devised a way to find the dominant eye on the pool table and it is fool proof.

I can find anyones real dominant eye and help them enhance their aiming ability.

Without knowing which eye is dominant this can not be done.

And there are so many things that need to be tweaked to work around this eye improvement. Stance, stroke and eyes all have to match up. Not an easy task sometimes.

I can get everyone in their most perfect position. But it is real easy to slip back to the old positions without even knowing it happened.

This is why when i do a lesson I give that player unlimited free tuneups. Either on skype or just over the phone. Just by going over my own personal check list with the player i can correct the missing part in a quick hurry.

I do this on Skype for only $150. This lesson is priceless for any player at any level.

But it kind of gets lost among all the other crap out there that people are saying will help ones game.

This is the real deal my friends. Just read the glowing testimonials on this thread.

:thumbup:
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just had an order for the DVD from Germany.

whyPN ? this is a forum and there are definitely players like me who are very interested in your solution

The skype lesson is $150 and this is like a giveaway. Right now the players that order the DVD are not only getting that but I am doing a free skype lesson with them.

I hope this is you and I'm looking forward to working with you.

Best thing you could ever do for your pool game at any level. :thumbup:
 

paolo2144

Registered
I have to agree with Gene on the absolute pivotal importance of finding your correct line of aim/vision centre, it really is vital.

As i have said before due to Covid-19 i have only been able to practice on a home fold away table i purchased around mid April. I literally only get chance to practice once a week on Saturday. It is an English sized pool table but with very tight pockets.

In order to drill my stroke i always start with practicing medium length straight in shots and without fail i always miss a large number of first 10 or so shots until i find my exact "vision centre". I know from doing various tests my ideal cue position is roughly about 3/4 inch away to left of centre of chin, almost under start of left eye at side of nose.

I have tendency when taking first few pots to be just too far to the left and usually takes a few pots to correct this. I missed first 6 last week then made next 18 in a row once i had found my correct line of sight. Everything else was the same I.E. solid stance, same bridge, same cue action and delivery but unless i am lined up 100% then no matter how straight my cue action is i will miss quite a few pots.

I suspect this will be same for others. As i have said before all the fundamentals and correct type of practice are important, but unless you are sighting in a true straight line you will struggle with consistency.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have to add that unless your stroke goes in a straight line; ie you can shoot a perfect center ball at will, you'll always be compromising to cinch your pet shots.
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Your way ahead of the game....

I have to agree with Gene on the absolute pivotal importance of finding your correct line of aim/vision centre, it really is vital.

As i have said before due to Covid-19 i have only been able to practice on a home fold away table i purchased around mid April. I literally only get chance to practice once a week on Saturday. It is an English sized pool table but with very tight pockets.

In order to drill my stroke i always start with practicing medium length straight in shots and without fail i always miss a large number of first 10 or so shots until i find my exact "vision centre". I know from doing various tests my ideal cue position is roughly about 3/4 inch away to left of centre of chin, almost under start of left eye at side of nose.

I have tendency when taking first few pots to be just too far to the left and usually takes a few pots to correct this. I missed first 6 last week then made next 18 in a row once i had found my correct line of sight. Everything else was the same I.E. solid stance, same bridge, same cue action and delivery but unless i am lined up 100% then no matter how straight my cue action is i will miss quite a few pots.

I suspect this will be same for others. As i have said before all the fundamentals and correct type of practice are important, but unless you are sighting in a true straight line you will struggle with consistency.

You will also know that being left eye dominant you might have a little bit of trouble getting to center ball. Most left eye dominant players come down a little or allot to the left of center. This can be corrected with some positioning in the preshot.

The same as with putting right English on the cue ball. The left eye dominant person doesn't get as much right English as they think they are. The way to see this for yourself is to get down on a shot with a bunch of right hand English, keep the tip of the cue right where it is and raise only your head up. You might be amazed at how little right hand English you were actually getting.

You can have the straightest stroke in the world but if your getting accidental left or right hand English it's pretty tough to improve.

Unless you play 10 hours a day, every day for about 5 years. Your eyes will get there pretty good from repetition. Like many pros do , or higher level players. Many of them don't have a clue how they are doing what they are doing. The problem with that is now you don't have a job anymore, house is gone, wife left and took the kids, bank account is empty.

Or you can learn exactly how all this works and get playing real good and keep everything.

:thumbup:
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just trying to make some money...

I was on the road for 5 years traveling from pool hall to pool hall. I never found anyone that would bet anything that would amount to anything if we played. Now I'm 67 years old. 7/18/53.

I got one actual offer from someone that would play 10 ball for $10,0000.00. It was his friend that replied. the other one was trying to find a backer.

We got the cash here and are not planning on losing but they have to be older than me. That's the rule. Got about 3 offers from players that are younger but still pretty old.

I got 6,000 of the action and gave the other 4,000 to some friends here in the Twin Cities.

I hope to find someone and a bunch of someones. It would be fun and exciting.

If I didn't know what I know with these eyes there is no way I could play at the level I am right now.

I'm just trying to get some fair action. When we are very young at ages 5 to 16 there is a but difference. And they have tournaments for the age brackets. Once a player reaches 65 to 80 it's about the same.

I'm playing the best pool of my life right now. I can't travel and play because of all the medical stuff I got going on but that is why we play only if they can come here.

Younger players don't get it bit the players that are over 65 really understand how tough it is to older at a higher level.

I did 6 full lessons here this week. Helped these players get the tools to get them playing better than ever before.

One guy was so excited he played a player for a little cash that should have been out of his league. And he won. My guy I worked with is a B player. The guy he played is an A player. They played cheap but my guy was so excited he couldn't hardly believe it.

I only did a partial lesson with him. The guys an athlete and just couldn't understand why he couldn't get there playing pool .

He knows now. It don't get any better than this. ..
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
One important thing to do.

I strive for central alignment. I think the biggest problem with this and pool aiming in general is dropping your cue vertically into a shot. All the joints involved hinge in directions unrelated to shooting pool. You see all manner of compensation from torso pivots, diagonal slashes, getting into firing position is truly technique intensive. Through my own experimentation with leaning over the cue or placing the cue outside your head, the primary function seems to be one of cue/stroke alignment and coherence with one's personal stance/cueball line.

I think the real visual issue is the cue is so close to your face that the eyes simply cannot focus on it and the cue ball. Some people do the Machino thing w/variations on toggling views from cueball to object ball etc...
I locate the stick/stroke line first and then I do the thing drunks do - and this might be the greatest wisdom in pool, ever; "Shoot the one in the middle."

Dropping your cue vertically into a shot. Players need to keep the cue off to the side a little when dropping down into the shot. Coming straight down with the cue can cause trouble with your vision. If you are looking through the cue to see the shot on the way down you are creating many optical illusions.

To see what i mean just put your cue up in front of you eye while watching tv. Gets pretty annoying. And hard to even see the picture well.

If your right handed keep it to the left a little on the way down. Left handed keep it to the right.

Just something to share and keep from happening. Just trying to help. :cool:
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dropping your cue vertically into a shot. Players need to keep the cue off to the side a little when dropping down into the shot. Coming straight down with the cue can cause trouble with your vision. If you are looking through the cue to see the shot on the way down you are creating many optical illusions.

To see what i mean just put your cue up in front of you eye while watching tv. Gets pretty annoying. And hard to even see the picture well.

If your right handed keep it to the left a little on the way down. Left handed keep it to the right.

Just something to share and keep from happening. Just trying to help. :cool:

Exactly. I've focused on this aspect the past couple months and at this stage, I use the double vision illusion to check my alignment. It's actually pretty reliable. The fail points so far are all stroke. I get way down and it's pretty cramped there; that and I'm firing from the cue ball as opposed to watching the collision/carom aspect of a shot.
It's like re-research but SO lacking in my marksmanship.
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Words of wisdom for sure......

I have to agree with Gene on the absolute pivotal importance of finding your correct line of aim/vision centre, it really is vital.

As i have said before due to Covid-19 i have only been able to practice on a home fold away table i purchased around mid April. I literally only get chance to practice once a week on Saturday. It is an English sized pool table but with very tight pockets.

In order to drill my stroke i always start with practicing medium length straight in shots and without fail i always miss a large number of first 10 or so shots until i find my exact "vision centre". I know from doing various tests my ideal cue position is roughly about 3/4 inch away to left of centre of chin, almost under start of left eye at side of nose.

I have tendency when taking first few pots to be just too far to the left and usually takes a few pots to correct this. I missed first 6 last week then made next 18 in a row once i had found my correct line of sight. Everything else was the same I.E. solid stance, same bridge, same cue action and delivery but unless i am lined up 100% then no matter how straight my cue action is i will miss quite a few pots.

I suspect this will be same for others. As i have said before all the fundamentals and correct type of practice are important, but unless you are sighting in a true straight line you will struggle with consistency.

All I have to do here in the Twin Cities to set up a few lessons is show a few players the problems this dominant eye causes not being in the most dominant position.

I can only do one lesson a day. takes about 3 to 4 hours in person and it is so much fun showing a player this for the very first time.

I can see the light turn on. Just like when I showed this to Rodney Morris back in 2009. He signing my little notebook and said. I saw the light. 7/9/2009.

This is like an awakening for any pool player and I don't care who you are.

This is the reason that lower level players cannot improve.

On the other hand, it's why all players get stuck at a certain level. It's how good they can get these eyes there naturally. Whether it be from repetition from hours of practice like the pros or just getting there better naturally than everyone else.

The players that get there naturally are the ones that get better faster not knowing at all why?

But all players are addicted to this addicting game. No matter what level of play.

We have a weekly tournament at one of the local pool halls here in the Twin Cities. 8 ball on sat and 9 ball on Sunday. $15 entry in both.

The players I am working with finally feel like they can compete a little. They are playing better and want to hone their skills.

They used to average about 10 to 20 players each day.

Lately it's been 20 to 28. As I look around I see about a dozen or so are players I have worked with lately. This is great to see.

Makes me feel pretty good to see this happening.

Making pool just a little bit greater on a local level.

I will be traveling and teaching again as soon as this pandemic lets up. So I'm doing all the work I can do before I leave.

So much fun. :thumbup:
 
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