Where's Glen Hancock (Therealkingcobra)?!?

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
More like a dead forum. Lunch break on a construction job often a discussion would start and soon a dozen guys are hotly debating a topic. The whistle blows to go back to work and somebody asks a final opinion. Eleven other guys shrug their shoulders, "who cares?" Glen is down to restating exactly the same thing I said, I would be replying to me to reply to him. I'll look and laugh awhile until something more interesting comes along or something new and silly, as distinct from old and silly, is said on this thread.

I am debating if I should start a thread on the best tip or the best CF shaft on the forum. Lean times on AZB!

Hu
No doubt. LEAN indeed.
 

7stud

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Was this ever resolved, I see realkingcobra is posting again so maybe he can shed some light on this?
Apparently, RKC was rebuilding someone's transmission in a car shop, and he was too busy to work on the customer's rails. After awhile, the customer got tired of waiting and just wanted his rails back, but RKC shipped him a half built transmission, and now some guy is posting on AZTransmissions that RKC installed rails in his car, and the car won't shift out of park:

car-style-pool-table-500x500.jpeg
 
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Dead Money

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
More like a dead forum. Lunch break on a construction job often a discussion would start and soon a dozen guys are hotly debating a topic. The whistle blows to go back to work and somebody asks a final opinion. Eleven other guys shrug their shoulders, "who cares?" Glen is down to restating exactly the same thing I said, I would be replying to me to reply to him. I'll look and laugh awhile until something more interesting comes along or something new and silly, as distinct from old and silly, is said on this thread.

I am debating if I should start a thread on the best tip or the best CF shaft on the forum. Lean times on AZB!

Hu
Go to a Mustang forum and start a "Which mufflers for my 5.0?" thread instead. It will play out the same way.
 

ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
Go to a Mustang forum and start a "Which mufflers for my 5.0?" thread instead. It will play out the same way.

I had a '65 2+2, 289 and a wide ratio four speed. By the time I got through I had more money in the engine than the car cost new but it was hell in the street car wars. I had lightened the already light car and loosened the front suspension. That thing would stand on it's hind legs when I dumped the clutch. The mustangs of today might be faster but they would pee all over themselves if I parked that thing next to them! Two brothers managed to punch and poke on a 289 until it was over four hundred cubic inches. That would be a sleeper!

Maybe I will go ask them why the 2 series was so maligned. I thought it had potential with the 302 in it. It wasn't that different from the original.

Hu
 

Dead Money

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I had a '65 2+2, 289 and a wide ratio four speed. By the time I got through I had more money in the engine than the car cost new but it was hell in the street car wars. I had lightened the already light car and loosened the front suspension. That thing would stand on it's hind legs when I dumped the clutch. The mustangs of today might be faster but they would pee all over themselves if I parked that thing next to them! Two brothers managed to punch and poke on a 289 until it was over four hundred cubic inches. That would be a sleeper!

Maybe I will go ask them why the 2 series was so maligned. I thought it had potential with the 302 in it. It wasn't that different from the original.

Hu
Hahahaha!! " I had one of the II's, not a bad little car. 1975 , V8 4 speed, a few mods a bit of N20. 100 shot. Pretty sweet for it's time.
 

magnetardo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Was this ever resolved, I see realkingcobra is posting again so maybe he can shed some light on this?
Yeah. It was resolved just like the other guys who had their rails stolen from Glen. Shit out of luck. Thankfully Jerimy Chambers made the OP a new set of rails at a loss to get the guy up and playing again because that's the kind of character Jerimy has. Some people on here gave him donations to help the cause which he was extremely grateful for, but not a nickel from Glen of course. So Glen pocketed $1750 and a set of GC rails. That's the kind of character he is. 🤨 Wonder where those Gandy rails Glen stole are at now. There's been multiple reports of this guy ripping people off going back almost 10 years. How he is even allowed on this forum baffles me.
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
I had a '65 2+2, 289 and a wide ratio four speed. By the time I got through I had more money in the engine than the car cost new but it was hell in the street car wars. I had lightened the already light car and loosened the front suspension. That thing would stand on it's hind legs when I dumped the clutch. The mustangs of today might be faster but they would pee all over themselves if I parked that thing next to them! Two brothers managed to punch and poke on a 289 until it was over four hundred cubic inches. That would be a sleeper!

Maybe I will go ask them why the 2 series was so maligned. I thought it had potential with the 302 in it. It wasn't that different from the original.

Hu
While in the service and home on leave my brother-in-law would surprise me occasionally by renting one of these...We'd ride around making even the Vett owners scratch their heads...thing was a pure monster...Fun...

1966 Shelby GT350H Facts​

  • 1,001 Produced
  • Cobra 289 High-Performance V8 engine
  • Output: 306 hp and 329 lb-ft of torque
  • Total cost in 1966: $17 a day and 17 cents a mile
1621944887137.png



Hertz Heritage: The Rise of the 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350-H Resources


Car enthusiasts are well aware of the history that was made in the year 1966: the introduction of the special-edition Shelby Mustang GT350-H. As soon as this remarkable Mustang was born, it had car fans immediately smitten with its gorgeous design and ultra-high performance. The car was only available for rental through Hertz, and the “H” in the name stood for – you guessed it – Hertz.

According to Joe Conway, Co-CEO of Carroll Shelby International and CEO of Shelby American, “The 1966 Ford Shelby GT350-H became a legend from the moment it was introduced.” It wasn’t just the design that created such a buzz — it was also the incredible opportunity given to regular working-class people to be able to rent these dream sports cars through Hertz.

A Hertz ad from 1966 shows a Shelby Mustang GT 350-H on a race track with text that reads, ‘Add a dash of excitement to your next business trip.

Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program​

Over 50 years ago, in September of 1965, the General Manager of Shelby American, Peyton Cramer, and the Hertz Corporation came to a brilliant business agreement: They would offer the 1966 GT350-H as a rental car through the now-famous Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program. This deal created 1,000 Shelby Mustang GT350-Hs for use in the Hertz rental fleet, allowing customers to do more than just rent a standard rental vehicle for their needs.

A brochure from 1966 introduced the cars to eager renters, “These cars are available to business travelers who want a change of pace in motoring, by sports car owners away from home and by vacations who consider driving an enjoyable sport.”

The “Rent-a-Racer” Program inspired more customers to rent with Hertz (who wouldn’t jump at the opportunity to rent their dream car for the weekend?), while also creating more potential buyers for Shelby Mustang – talk about a genius business idea.

Members of the Hertz Sports Car Club in 1966 who were 25 years of age or older would simply pay $17 per day and 17 cents per mile (a pretty great deal for the time) and get to drive away from the Hertz lot in a performance 306 horsepower Mustang fastback. For most drivers, this was a chance to sit in the driver’s seat of a luxurious and powerful vehicle for a great deal—when purchasing that model may have been out of their price range.
A Hertz ad from 1966 shows two images of the Shelby Mustang GT 350-H, one with the car driving on a road, and one with the car off-roading in the desert.

Shelby GT350H Mustang and Hertz Today​

The Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program was a huge success for its time, but eventually came to an end after the pattern of vehicle repair expenses became too high. (Tales of the time say that some renters would take the GT350-H to the race track for a weekend of amateur racing, leaving much to be fixed upon return of the rental.) However, to those who were fortunate enough to experience the magic of renting a racer, the memories live on.

Classic car collectors have seen the 1966 Shelby GT350-H Mustang become a highly sought-after vehicle. The ones that are still left in commission are now extremely valuable, earning a net of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars or more in auctions. Those who are lucky enough to still own a Shelby GT350-H hold the keys to a piece of integral Mustang and Hertz history.

In 2006, forty years after its initial creation in 1966, Shelby and Hertz reunited once again to introduce the 2006 Shelby GT-H Mustang, available to rent in what was then called the Hertz “Fun Collection.” The 2006 Shelby GT-H Mustang, a new take on an old 60s model held a very classic, muscular build with some true performance favorite credentials.

Ten years later, in 2016, Hertz and Shelby once again teamed up to bring back the car for the fiftieth anniversary of the partnership. Ford produced 140 Mustang GT-Hs for that were available in ther Hertz “Adrenaline Collection” at 17 airport locations across the U.S.

Are you interested in more Hertz history? How about how a 22-year-old was able to start the company that later became the Hertz Corporation with a fleet of just 12 Model-Ts in 1918? You can read that story here.
 
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ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
While in the service my brother-in-law would surprise me occasionally by renting one of these...We'd ride around making even the Vett owners scratch their heads...thing was a pure monster...Fun...

1966 Shelby GT350H Facts​

  • 1,001 Produced
  • Cobra 289 High-Performance V8 engine
  • Output: 306 hp and 329 lb-ft of torque
  • Total cost in 1966: $17 a day and 17 cents a mile
View attachment 596374


Hertz Heritage: The Rise of the 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350-H Resources


Car enthusiasts are well aware of the history that was made in the year 1966: the introduction of the special-edition Shelby Mustang GT350-H. As soon as this remarkable Mustang was born, it had car fans immediately smitten with its gorgeous design and ultra-high performance. The car was only available for rental through Hertz, and the “H” in the name stood for – you guessed it – Hertz.

According to Joe Conway, Co-CEO of Carroll Shelby International and CEO of Shelby American, “The 1966 Ford Shelby GT350-H became a legend from the moment it was introduced.” It wasn’t just the design that created such a buzz — it was also the incredible opportunity given to regular working-class people to be able to rent these dream sports cars through Hertz.

A Hertz ad from 1966 shows a Shelby Mustang GT 350-H on a race track with text that reads, ‘Add a dash of excitement to your next business trip.

Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program​

Over 50 years ago, in September of 1965, the General Manager of Shelby American, Peyton Cramer, and the Hertz Corporation came to a brilliant business agreement: They would offer the 1966 GT350-H as a rental car through the now-famous Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program. This deal created 1,000 Shelby Mustang GT350-Hs for use in the Hertz rental fleet, allowing customers to do more than just rent a standard rental vehicle for their needs.

A brochure from 1966 introduced the cars to eager renters, “These cars are available to business travelers who want a change of pace in motoring, by sports car owners away from home and by vacations who consider driving an enjoyable sport.”

The “Rent-a-Racer” Program inspired more customers to rent with Hertz (who wouldn’t jump at the opportunity to rent their dream car for the weekend?), while also creating more potential buyers for Shelby Mustang – talk about a genius business idea.

Members of the Hertz Sports Car Club in 1966 who were 25 years of age or older would simply pay $17 per day and 17 cents per mile (a pretty great deal for the time) and get to drive away from the Hertz lot in a performance 306 horsepower Mustang fastback. For most drivers, this was a chance to sit in the driver’s seat of a luxurious and powerful vehicle for a great deal—when purchasing that model may have been out of their price range.
A Hertz ad from 1966 shows two images of the Shelby Mustang GT 350-H, one with the car driving on a road, and one with the car off-roading in the desert.

Shelby GT350H Mustang and Hertz Today​

The Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program was a huge success for its time, but eventually came to an end after the pattern of vehicle repair expenses became too high. (Tales of the time say that some renters would take the GT350-H to the race track for a weekend of amateur racing, leaving much to be fixed upon return of the rental.) However, to those who were fortunate enough to experience the magic of renting a racer, the memories live on.

Classic car collectors have seen the 1966 Shelby GT350-H Mustang become a highly sought-after vehicle. The ones that are still left in commission are now extremely valuable, earning a net of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars or more in auctions. Those who are lucky enough to still own a Shelby GT350-H hold the keys to a piece of integral Mustang and Hertz history.

In 2006, forty years after its initial creation in 1966, Shelby and Hertz reunited once again to introduce the 2006 Shelby GT-H Mustang, available to rent in what was then called the Hertz “Fun Collection.” The 2006 Shelby GT-H Mustang, a new take on an old 60s model held a very classic, muscular build with some true performance favorite credentials.

Ten years later, in 2016, Hertz and Shelby once again teamed up to bring back the car for the fiftieth anniversary of the partnership. Ford produced 140 Mustang GT-Hs for that were available in ther Hertz “Adrenaline Collection” at 17 airport locations across the U.S.

Are you interested in more Hertz history? How about how a 22-year-old was able to start the company that later became the Hertz Corporation with a fleet of just 12 Model-Ts in 1918? You can read that story here.


I owned the '65 2+2 with a worked engine. It didn't handle great before I loosened up the suspension, afterwards it was unsafe at any speed. Brakes sucked too, I think it had four wheel drums best I recall while that Shelby had four wheel disks and a much nicer handling package. I tried to top end the Mustang once after building the engine. It would roast the wide ovals when I shifted down into second or third at sixty but how fast would it go? Tried to find out one night. Came out of an S curve doing seventy in third. Ran it up until it pinned the speedo still pulling pretty hard in third. Shifted into fourth with the needle buried in the corner of the 120MPH gauge. Four miles of straight road but not much further into the run I could not tell where I was at. Everything to the side was a blur, couldn't see but about a basketball sized area directly in front of me! I was young and dumb but this road ended at a stop sign, an embankment, and some mature hardwoods. I wasn't real crazy about being combed out of the top of the oaks. Kept my foot in it a little longer but I had no idea how fast I was going and the car was drifting so bad that it was touching grass on both sides of a wide two lane. Promised myself if I got that puppy stopped I wouldn't do that again! The Mustang and a Norton 850 were the only two things I didn't top end until after I turned 25 years old.

I did have '63 and '66 Corvette Stingrays. They were heavy puppies, took a lot of horsepower to get them moving. I top ended the '66 at 139 stock although their speedometers were generally a little optimistic. I put a pair of fully ported race heads and my intake and carb off of my race car after I floated the valves top ending it since it was wintertime anyway. A small cam while I was at it. Might have been the fastest car in town for a short time. Something came loose in the rear end under maximum acceleration. Fair to say the rear end blew! Most thoroughly destroyed third member I have ever seen.

The little Mustang including the one from Mickey wouldn't be in the running with the early 427 Corvettes but spotting the Corvettes almost 150 cubic inches would be a tough nut to crack for anything! I wanted to try the 'stang against a 427 Vette but it never happened. It never got beaten though when some pretty fast stuff was on the street in the late sixties and early seventies and street racing was very common. Stupid, but I was still young enough to be immortal and think everyone else was too!

The li'l Mustang had steel wheels on it from my circle track influences and a faded blue/gray paint job that held up lousy from the factory. After I put a full race cam in it and headers with mufflers I could drop a pool ball through I would strategically kill it if I saw a cop at a red light. It couldn't leave the line at less than 2800 without killing, supposed to leave at a minimum of three grand. Kill it, pet the pooch a bit restarting it, got a few laughs from the cops but never a ticket!

I had built the Mustang to run in a NHRA pro class. They had a huge shake-up in the rules and now after a lot more money spent on it, it would have to run Gas/Altered for a trophy! That is one reason I never played pool for trophies, or ran trophy dashes with my circle track cars. A track passed a rule that the top six cars had to run the trophy dash if they were able so I used to pull in the pits after qualifying and tell the team to take the left front tire and wheel off, I was going sit in the stands and socialize until time for the prelim's I did run.

Good times long ago! Fortunately a tree fell on the little Mustang, probably why I am here today.

Hu

Edit: The Corvettes with four wheel disks would stop, saved my bacon a few times. Passing a line of cars on the way to work one morning, I was idly looking over and counting cars as I passed a dozen give or take. Look back and traffic heading at me on the two lane. Look down, 120 on the speedo. Strong braking and tucked into a slot that didn't exist for most cars!
 

Chili Palmer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
While in the service and home on leave my brother-in-law would surprise me occasionally by renting one of these...We'd ride around making even the Vett owners scratch their heads...thing was a pure monster...Fun...

1966 Shelby GT350H Facts​

  • 1,001 Produced
  • Cobra 289 High-Performance V8 engine
  • Output: 306 hp and 329 lb-ft of torque
  • Total cost in 1966: $17 a day and 17 cents a mile
View attachment 596374


Hertz Heritage: The Rise of the 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350-H Resources


Car enthusiasts are well aware of the history that was made in the year 1966: the introduction of the special-edition Shelby Mustang GT350-H. As soon as this remarkable Mustang was born, it had car fans immediately smitten with its gorgeous design and ultra-high performance. The car was only available for rental through Hertz, and the “H” in the name stood for – you guessed it – Hertz.

According to Joe Conway, Co-CEO of Carroll Shelby International and CEO of Shelby American, “The 1966 Ford Shelby GT350-H became a legend from the moment it was introduced.” It wasn’t just the design that created such a buzz — it was also the incredible opportunity given to regular working-class people to be able to rent these dream sports cars through Hertz.

A Hertz ad from 1966 shows a Shelby Mustang GT 350-H on a race track with text that reads, ‘Add a dash of excitement to your next business trip.

Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program​

Over 50 years ago, in September of 1965, the General Manager of Shelby American, Peyton Cramer, and the Hertz Corporation came to a brilliant business agreement: They would offer the 1966 GT350-H as a rental car through the now-famous Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program. This deal created 1,000 Shelby Mustang GT350-Hs for use in the Hertz rental fleet, allowing customers to do more than just rent a standard rental vehicle for their needs.

A brochure from 1966 introduced the cars to eager renters, “These cars are available to business travelers who want a change of pace in motoring, by sports car owners away from home and by vacations who consider driving an enjoyable sport.”

The “Rent-a-Racer” Program inspired more customers to rent with Hertz (who wouldn’t jump at the opportunity to rent their dream car for the weekend?), while also creating more potential buyers for Shelby Mustang – talk about a genius business idea.

Members of the Hertz Sports Car Club in 1966 who were 25 years of age or older would simply pay $17 per day and 17 cents per mile (a pretty great deal for the time) and get to drive away from the Hertz lot in a performance 306 horsepower Mustang fastback. For most drivers, this was a chance to sit in the driver’s seat of a luxurious and powerful vehicle for a great deal—when purchasing that model may have been out of their price range.
A Hertz ad from 1966 shows two images of the Shelby Mustang GT 350-H, one with the car driving on a road, and one with the car off-roading in the desert.

Shelby GT350H Mustang and Hertz Today​

The Hertz “Rent-a-Racer” Program was a huge success for its time, but eventually came to an end after the pattern of vehicle repair expenses became too high. (Tales of the time say that some renters would take the GT350-H to the race track for a weekend of amateur racing, leaving much to be fixed upon return of the rental.) However, to those who were fortunate enough to experience the magic of renting a racer, the memories live on.

Classic car collectors have seen the 1966 Shelby GT350-H Mustang become a highly sought-after vehicle. The ones that are still left in commission are now extremely valuable, earning a net of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars or more in auctions. Those who are lucky enough to still own a Shelby GT350-H hold the keys to a piece of integral Mustang and Hertz history.

In 2006, forty years after its initial creation in 1966, Shelby and Hertz reunited once again to introduce the 2006 Shelby GT-H Mustang, available to rent in what was then called the Hertz “Fun Collection.” The 2006 Shelby GT-H Mustang, a new take on an old 60s model held a very classic, muscular build with some true performance favorite credentials.

Ten years later, in 2016, Hertz and Shelby once again teamed up to bring back the car for the fiftieth anniversary of the partnership. Ford produced 140 Mustang GT-Hs for that were available in ther Hertz “Adrenaline Collection” at 17 airport locations across the U.S.

Are you interested in more Hertz history? How about how a 22-year-old was able to start the company that later became the Hertz Corporation with a fleet of just 12 Model-Ts in 1918? You can read that story here.


The remake of that came out in 2006 and at that time I was traveling 45+ weeks a year and renting from Hertz 50+ times a year. It was only available at one airport I frequented (Denver) but whenever I actually left the airport they were sold out :cry:
 

Jaden

"no buds chill"
Silver Member
How did this turn into a mustang thread? I've owned 3 mustangs in my life. I still have a 64 1/2 K-code. I had a 66 mustang that lost a wheel on the freeway and spun around 3 and a 1/2 times. It ended up getting totalled after safely coming to a rest and getting hit by a drunk teen. I then replaced that with a 95 mustang gt that I added a supercharger to.

Jaden

p.s. I clicked on the thread because I just ran into Glen up in Washington state trying to get Dave at the golden fleece to have him recover some of his tables.
 

ghost ball

justnum survivor
Silver Member
How did this turn into a mustang thread? I've owned 3 mustangs in my life. I still have a 64 1/2 K-code. I had a 66 mustang that lost a wheel on the freeway and spun around 3 and a 1/2 times. It ended up getting totalled after safely coming to a rest and getting hit by a drunk teen. I then replaced that with a 95 mustang gt that I added a supercharger to.

Jaden

p.s. I clicked on the thread because I just ran into Glen up in Washington state trying to get Dave at the golden fleece to have him recover some of his tables.
Looks like you found him and this thread is done.
 

Chili Palmer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
How did this turn into a mustang thread? I've owned 3 mustangs in my life. I still have a 64 1/2 K-code. I had a 66 mustang that lost a wheel on the freeway and spun around 3 and a 1/2 times. It ended up getting totalled after safely coming to a rest and getting hit by a drunk teen. I then replaced that with a 95 mustang gt that I added a supercharger to.

Jaden

p.s. I clicked on the thread because I just ran into Glen up in Washington state trying to get Dave at the golden fleece to have him recover some of his tables.

My friends parents had a yellow 64 1/2 hard top they bought new. One fender had been repainted in the 70's and was fading a bit different but gorgeous car. My brother had a '66 hard top, baby blue, 289, 4sp, posi, fun car but he couldn't beat my El Camino ;).

In 2004 I had an opportunity to purchase a 64 1/2 convertible, essentially in boxes, for $1200 - I passed because I just purchased a Jeep to build :cry:

I have owned two Fox body's. An '86 GT vert (black, 5 speed) and an 84 5.0 LX vert (baby blue, auto). The GT got full exhaust, new air box, timing - all the basic Fox stuff. Had a good time in that car. Sold it to move then got into Jeeps.
 
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Jaden

"no buds chill"
Silver Member
Who said Mustang...
Borla's on the 4.6
The 4.6 might be one of the best sounding v8's ever produced.

Jaden

I'm currently building an all aluminum turbo 4.6 for either a drag truck or a swap into my frs. I had just finished a custom turbo no a VR6 jetta, but right after I got it idling on the standalone ecu it caught on fire and burned to the ground. I was lucky it didn't take my house with it.
 
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