3 fouling an 11 year old

Physiqz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was playing in a tournament the other day, I am a 10 and he was a 1. I had to give last 5, wild 8 and a game on the wire to this kid. At one point I was down 3-4 with him on the hill. I had to go to 6 and he had to get to 5. Made it Hill-Hill, he broke dry and scratched.
The balls weren't very spread out and not an easy run out by any means.

So I 3 fouled him on the hill for the win. I felt like an a-hole because he was 11 and of course a few tears came about me 3 fouling him.

I thought about it before hand and figured I would give him the courtesy to treat him like an equal, and it would provide a lesson to him.

Should I feel bad, or did I do the right thing?
 

Inaction

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Back in 1989, I played a six year old who was very capable of running the table if left an open shot. I had no problem with playing a safe.

He was scolded afterwards for not leaving me safe. I believe the guy said "Shane, you have to play a safe if you don't have a shot"
 

pocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was playing in a tournament the other day, I am a 10 and he was a 1. I had to give last 5, wild 8 and a game on the wire to this kid. At one point I was down 3-4 with him on the hill. I had to go to 6 and he had to get to 5. Made it Hill-Hill, he broke dry and scratched.
The balls weren't very spread out and not an easy run out by any means.

So I 3 fouled him on the hill for the win. I felt like an a-hole because he was 11 and of course a few tears came about me 3 fouling him.

I thought about it before hand and figured I would give him the courtesy to treat him like an equal, and it would provide a lesson to him.

Should I feel bad, or did I do the right thing?

He entered the tournament and shouldn't expect anyone to give him anything other than his handicap. Safeties are an integral part of the game.
 

Physiqz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Back in 1989, I played a six year old who was very capable of running the table if left an open shot. I had no problem with playing a safe.

He was scolded afterwards for not leaving me safe. I believe the guy said "Shane, you have to play a safe if you don't have a shot"

That is epic! Classic
 

De420MadHatter

SicBiNature
Silver Member
Hell no! Beat that ass!!!! It is said Mosconi, would beat his grandmother 150-0 if given a chance.
That's not verbatim ^^^^^, but pretty close :D
 

Physiqz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
He entered the tournament and shouldn't expect anyone to give him anything other than his handicap. Safeties are an integral part of the game.

My thoughts exactly. I explained to him that its just part of the game and that I respected his shot making ability enough to treat him like a regular player. He could run 3-4 balls in a row so I did what I should do.
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Should I feel bad, or did I do the right thing?

Yes and Yes.

When my son was 10 or so he played in the same local league as me. During the finals someone asked "I don't know how I should play him, do I try?". I said "of course you should play normally, he knows he is in a league and who he is playing with and he is getting a spot from you anyway".

You have to learn to lose before you can win, and you definitely have to learn how to handle losing and being behind to play well.

I beat up on much weaker players all the time, and almost never feel bad, but in almost every case after the game I show them some clear mistakes they made to help them in the future.

Was the kid interested in learning? He played a close game with a much better player, that is something. You need to make sure he knows he played well and you had to play your best to win. For that age that may not matter much, but with the right parents and other players helping him it will grow into something.
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
Hopefully you also talked him into a side bet for his lunch money....:wink:
 

Physiqz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes and Yes.

When my son was 10 or so he played in the same local league as me. During the finals someone asked "I don't know how I should play him, do I try?". I said "of course you should play normally, he knows he is in a league and who he is playing with and he is getting a spot from you anyway".

You have to learn to lose before you can win, and you definitely have to learn how to handle losing and being behind to play well.

I beat up on much weaker players all the time, and almost never feel bad, but in almost every case after the game I show them some clear mistakes they made to help them in the future.

Was the kid interested in learning? He played a close game with a much better player, that is something. You need to make sure he knows he played well and you had to play your best to win. For that age that may not matter much, but with the right parents and other players helping him it will grow into something.

He was very interested in learning. His dad is co-owner of place I was shooting at, a very good player as well, another 10. I told him he gave me all I could handle and he shot well. Tried to explain he doesn't need to always shoot as hard as he can because he definitely loses accuracy and position, but that's another topic all together. If he keeps up with it, he will be one to reckon with.
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was playing in a tournament the other day, I am a 10 and he was a 1. I had to give last 5, wild 8 and a game on the wire to this kid. At one point I was down 3-4 with him on the hill. I had to go to 6 and he had to get to 5. Made it Hill-Hill, he broke dry and scratched.
The balls weren't very spread out and not an easy run out by any means.

So I 3 fouled him on the hill for the win. I felt like an a-hole because he was 11 and of course a few tears came about me 3 fouling him.

I thought about it before hand and figured I would give him the courtesy to treat him like an equal, and it would provide a lesson to him.

Should I feel bad, or did I do the right thing?


Three foul his ass all day long -- it'll toughen the little booger right up.

In no time at all the kid will be sharking you, stealing games on the wire I say, drinking beer from a bottle, playin' for money in a pinch-back suit and list'nin to some big out-a-town Jasper tell about horse-race gamblin' -- not a wholesome trottin' race, no! But a race where they set down right on the horse!

Ya got trouble my friend.

Lou Figueroa
with apologies to
Meredith Wilson :-o
 

easy-e

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't care about much, but I think this might be my favorite thread title EVER!
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm a AA player.
I play in a bar league that is mostly B and C players.
It's an open handicap league,Shane could play in it if he wanted.
There might be a couple A players.
a player on the oppressing team last night missed 2 shots in a row with ball in hand!
This guy couldn't play a radio.
When it was my turn to play him i went after him like it was the Super Bowl.
Never show an opponent any mercy.
When you do some f##king banger will beat you.
 

slide13

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yeah, I'd feel bad myself but I think you did the right thing for sure. He entered a tournament and no point in taking it easy on him, he'll learn and become a better player for it. He may not enjoy the process always, but it'll be good for him.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
What's the best thing about beating 29 year olds?

You get twenty wins.

JC
 

TATE

AzB Gold Mensch
Gold Member
Silver Member
So I 3 fouled him on the hill for the win. I felt like an a-hole because he was 11 and of course a few tears came about me 3 fouling him.

The tears were probably more out of frustration than anything else. Nothing feels worse than 3 fouling, except maybe missing with ball in hand.

I suggest part of the handicap rule is no 3 fouling beginners. It's just too easy.
 

mfinkelstein3

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Unmerciful

Gee whiz, I wish you guys could have played with my father! Depression and World War Two guy that would 3 foul an infant AND take the scoring pennies.

I was 7 or 8 and playing rummy for pennies with my uncle (depression era boxer), my father and I. They took every penny I had, and couldn't stop laughing when I started crying to get my pennies back.

Of course you three foul your opponent! No questions asked, you always play your best.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was playing in a tournament the other day, I am a 10 and he was a 1. I had to give last 5, wild 8 and a game on the wire to this kid. At one point I was down 3-4 with him on the hill. I had to go to 6 and he had to get to 5. Made it Hill-Hill, he broke dry and scratched.
The balls weren't very spread out and not an easy run out by any means.

So I 3 fouled him on the hill for the win. I felt like an a-hole because he was 11 and of course a few tears came about me 3 fouling him.

I thought about it before hand and figured I would give him the courtesy to treat him like an equal, and it would provide a lesson to him.

Should I feel bad, or did I do the right thing?
I love pool. :)
 

PocketSpeed11

AzB Long Member
Silver Member
You should always be in it to win it. Never relent on playing your best and let him learn the hard way. Hopefully he'd be the kind of person who'd use disappointment as a means of motivation. If not, it's not your problem.
 

Inaction

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Of course you three foul your opponent! No questions asked, you always play your best.

Except when you are playing at a new location by yourself, and the opponent is much bigger, very drunk and has a short temper, and several short tempered drunk friends. Then, you might reconsider.
 
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