How to retip cues...... without a lathe

NervousNovice

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Is the Porper tip burnisher shown in http://www.seyberts.com/cue_accessories/kits/popupimages/step9.wmv a good alternative to simply using a piece of leather to burnish the side of the tip? Or is it better to just use the leather? In the video they mentioned the heat built up but in the first post RiverCity talked about how you should avoid heat. What is correct?

How does the Tiger "Insta-Cure+" glue compare to the LocTite Super glue?
 
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ShaneT58

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Charlie Edwards said:
River City...your method is the best. Before I got a lathe I did tips almost exactly the way you explained. Worked great! One small thing I'd like to add is when it comes to the final shaping of the tip, and not having access to a lathe, I found the best shaping tool was Trogdon's shaper. http://trogdoncues.com/tip_shaper.htm It's very quick, easy, and accurate.

You can make these yourself out of PVC pipe. Just find the radius you want and then cut the pipe down the middle and glue in some sand paper. I use 100 grit. They work great.
 

3andstop

Focus
Silver Member
1hit1der said:
Has anyone here tried using the Pocket Lathe to do tips? Just wondering how well it works since it looks like a very inexpensive alternative to getting a real lathe. Thanks.

http://www.pocketlathe.com/

shoot, I've been replacing my own tips for 40 yrs. I have something like that lathe. I put the shaft across my thighs and roll it with my left palm back and forth while I shape things with my right hand. :)

All this new fangled fancy stuff.... :)
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
NervousNovice said:
Is the Porper tip burnisher shown in http://www.seyberts.com/cue_accessories/kits/popupimages/step9.wmv a good alternative to simply using a piece of leather to burnish the side of the tip? Or is it better to just use the leather? In the video they mentioned the heat built up but in the first post RiverCity talked about how you should avoid heat. What is correct?

How does the Tiger "Insta-Cure+" glue compare to the LocTite Super glue?
Avoid the Porper tool..... the only thing they are really good for is REMOVING poorly installed tips. And if you bear down, you can remove a well installed tip also.
As far as the heat goes, sanding with 800 or 1500 grit etc creates more friction and heat than a smoother material such as leather. Dont get me wrong, you can overdo it with leather too...... you want a little heat but not to the point of feeling like you are burning your fingertips.
I stick with leather, its worked for years and years and is relatively safe.
Chuck
 

NervousNovice

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How many tips can the 0.14oz bottle of LocTite super glue last? Also, you talked about letting the glue soak in the tip. How long should that take? In seconds? Minutes? Does the glue dry up very fast?
 

Tommy-D

World's best B player...
Silver Member
> I agree 100%,the Porper burnisher is a piece of s**t. It will ruin tips and if used long enough will do some pretty nasty things to the ferrule as well. This is basically a glorifed joint protector.


> The Searing method where you use thin CA to seal the back of the tip works like this. You spread the glue out all over the sanded bottom,wait 2-3 seconds,and wipe with a clean paper towel. The back should have a uniform matte surface. Lightly sand this on a sanding block with 400,and use a thicker CA or one of the gel types to attach the tip. If done properly,and the ferrule is faced off flat,and don't have some cheapo import plastic ferrule,you can't take the tip off without cutting it off,pliers will cave it in before you twist it off. Tommy D.
 

JimS

Grandpa & his grand boys.
Silver Member
NervousNovice said:
Is the Porper tip burnisher shown in http://www.seyberts.com/cue_accessories/kits/popupimages/step9.wmv a good alternative to simply using a piece of leather to burnish the side of the tip? Or is it better to just use the leather? In the video they mentioned the heat built up but in the first post RiverCity talked about how you should avoid heat. What is correct?

How does the Tiger "Insta-Cure+" glue compare to the LocTite Super glue?

Just use leather. Can't comment on the glue. I use Loc Tite gel.
 

DonFelix

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
good method

i use sandpaper, a cutter and a willard for the end-shape only and it works very well for me
 

gregoryg

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Tip replacement ...

Been replacing my own tips for what seems like forever. Did it by hand for over 25 years until I decided to buy a lathe. Tips come out just as well as by hand, just takes less time now.
 

trueblu8

Let that stroke out baby!
Silver Member
Very nice man! Thanks! They should sticky this thread. Also, nice job with the pics, they came out great. Very enjoyable to see someone's work that knows how to use a digital camera properly. I like the high gloss finish that you were able to achieve as well.
 
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mullyman

Hung Like a Gnat!
Silver Member
Yeah, I've done mine with a cutter knife, glue, and sandpaper for years. I don't sand my ferrules. Cut the tip off like you did above, then remove excess tip junk with the cutter knife, like you did above, sand the backside of the tip and glue it on. Sorry, I do have one more knife that has the blade running across the top rather than the side that I use to cut the sides of the tip down with.
MULLY
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
This is very good info. In the old days I would change tips with some sandpaper, a good knife, a file (optional), glue and a strong rubber band. No clamp required.

I would remove the old tip with a sharp bladed knife (or one sided razor blade). To sand down the ferrule I would turn the cue upside down and hold it straight up in the air. Then twist it around with a piece of sandpaper on the ground (preferably a flat surface like a linoleum floor). Try standing on the sandpaper to keep it from moving. Turning it this way kept everything smooth and even. I would then sand the bottom of the tip lightly, and then apply the glue (Tweetens preferred). I liked a good even (but light) coating across the entire surface. Same on the ferrule.

One of the keys is to let the glue get tacky first before putting the tip on. Then I would use the rubber band to clamp the tip. It can also be done with no rubber band. Just balance the cue in a corner butt end up. The weight of the cue is all you need to apply proper pressure. I'd leave it overnight this way. In the morning the tip was ready to be sanded and shaped. My most important tools were a four way file and a good shaper. I liked the long curved hard plastic ones, with one flat side.

I ALWAYS have a variety of sandpapers from coarse (100-200) to ultra fine (800-1200) on hand. I've done literally hundreds of tips this way and maybe one or two has ever come off. I would always do them for my customers no charge (or maybe $5). Just call it good customer service.
 
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JimS

Grandpa & his grand boys.
Silver Member
Using the Porper Big Shaver almost always caused me to nick the ferrule. I like the Porper Little Shaver or just use the utility knife. Haven't tried the plane blade idea yet but I like that idea.
 

dooziexx

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Porper Big Shaver

Execellent post. I retip my own personal cues using the same exact equipment and steps :D. The only issue I have is that the Porper Big Shaver will only fit a 13mm or close to 13mm tips. I use a 14mm tip (which I trim down to 13) and I have to trim a little off the tip first with a utility knife before it can fit into the big shaver.
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
macguy said:
That may not seem like much but by the 10th tip replacement you have taken off 1/4 mm.

But, not wanting to start an argument here, the money you saved yourself by re-tipping your own cue 10 times as opposed to letting someone charge you $25 or more every time would easily pay for a ferrule replacement job ;) .

Maniac

P.S. RiverCity, I use blue Painter's tape instead of post-it notes.
 
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