How to retip cues...... without a lathe

Siz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Excellent post.

Ok the Porper's big shaver is kinda a dent in the wallet. what other tool is as efficient or as easy to use as that one?

You can use a razor knife to rough cut the sides, but you will still end up having to sand it down. On layered tips, I would be hesitant of cutting with a razor knife etc against the layers for fear of delamination problems.

I have always just used a sharp knife. Hold the cue vertically - tip downwards - and press firmly onto a solid surface. Then trim the tip using downward cuts. I have found that as long as my knife is sharp and I am pressing the cue down quite hard (in effect squeezing the tip between the ferule and your workbench), I do not have any delamination problems.

shoot, I've been replacing my own tips for 40 yrs. I have something like that lathe. I put the shaft across my thighs and roll it with my left palm back and forth while I shape things with my right hand. :)

All this new fangled fancy stuff.... :)

Same here. Works fine and does not take long.
 

spoonie

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Cue tip machine

Has anybody used the williard tipping machine,if so,what did you think about it.
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Has anybody used the williard tipping machine,if so,what did you think about it.

Very nice tool. They do a good job, however, unless you plan on doing tips for other people and making a little money..... they are a little spendy.
Chuck
 

chefjeff

New Green Zone
Silver Member
Very nice tool. They do a good job, however, unless you plan on doing tips for other people and making a little money..... they are a little spendy.
Chuck

How much? Is that the $300+ device that weighs a ton?

Jeff Livingston
 

8Ball48043

Addicted to the Sport
Silver Member
I will say that Sybert's has an entire deluxe retipping kit for about $60. Very nice kit and very similar to your instructions. it makes it very easy to do and they have downloadable step-by-step video instructions. I've done 3 tips so far with ZERO problems what so ever. And they have been profesional looking installs. That was one of the best pool investments I have made.

Do you have a link to that kit?
 

RafaReyes

Super Rafa
Silver Member
Awesome. Very informative. Thanks for sharing your knowledge on this. I'll invest on the tools and do it my self from now on.

Thank you,
 

DelaWho???

Banger McCue
Silver Member
Great thread, glad I rediscovered this right when I was ready to learn how to do tips myself.

I am using the top sander and the porper big shaver.

I've got a friend whose cue has a loose ferrule on it. I want to remove it and reinstall or replace it. It seems all of the ferrule material available at Meullers is 14mm. Is a lathe required to do ferrules?

Does anyone have any experience with the Tweeten tenoning machine? The descriptiona says it can "trim the ferrule to fit" but I don't want to end up with a rough looking pos when I am finished. Is it worth the money and easy/effective to use?

Thanks for the input

:cool:
 

ArizonaPete

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ferrules can be difficult. If it is just loose, you may be able to remelt the glue holding the ferrule by heating with a hair blower, thusly improving the bond. Be careful not to melt the ferrule. If you're set on replacing the ferrule, you still have to heat it to remove or cut if off. I think you're better off having someone do it for you.
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you can get the ferrule off the shaft, there is a possibility that you can reglue it, but you will have to make sure it is perfectly aligned. Gorilla glue should be used for this, since it will swell and help the fit of the tenon ti the ferrule.
If it is a good cue that he wants to keep playing with.... he really should have it fixed right by a repairman with a lathe. The tenon machine you speak of is halfway decent for house cues, but I would not use it on a personal cue. If youre careful you MIGHT be able to make it passable...... but its worth the 30-40 bucks.
Chuck
 

JTs cuerepair

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
very nice job

Nice job rivercity, very well done pictures and instructions on re tipping for those who need to know.. very big effort on your part...
 

Blue Hog ridr

World Famous Fisherman.
Silver Member
Very nice tutorial. Wouldn't know it wasn't done on a lathe.

Dela, Chuck is correct, the tenoning machine is basically for House Cues and you wouldn't be happy with the job it would turn out for yourself. They can cut new tenons and ferrules too.

The Willards is a decent machine. Just the same, the cutter is like a giant pencil sharpener and caution should be used as you can still take a chunk out of the ferrule if you're not watching.

There are many little devices out there, Porpers for example that basically duplicate what the Willards machine does for a fraction of the cost.

A person would be better off spending the money on a good repair lathe rather than a Willards. Then you have the freedom of also doing ferrules,
pin and insert changes, joint collars and butt caps, shaft maintenance, drilling and tapping etc. The only thing they can't do out of the box is build a cue. They can pay for themselves in no time and if its just a hobby, then you get a a lot of satisfaction out of just doing your own cues. Just hit the pawn shops and pick up a load of 5 dollar cues and go to town.

If anyone is interested, Todd (ts&b) something like that builds several different levels of repair lathes for a seriously great price.
His workmanship is second to none and a good guy to deal with.
 
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Vahony

Registered
I recently had to put a tip back on my break stick. It had popped off during a break and I had a guy put a new one on. Well after about 10 breaks it popped off as well. Maybe it was the glue or maybe he was in a hurry to get the tip/ferrule prepped. I prepped the ferrule and tip with 400 grit paper. I then wrapped a post-it note around the shaft so that there was about 1/8" past the ferrule. Applied the locktite glue to the tip and ferrule and put the tip back on. I used a rubber band to hold it in place overnight. So far it hasn't come off again.

I used the post-it note so that I had a guide to line up the tip with the ferrule. I wasn't about to put it on without something to help line it up. It didn't line up perfect but you can't tell by looking at it, only by touch. There was a little glue that got on the paper but was easily removed with finger nail polish, diluted with water.
 

Otterman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dremel me!!

This is almost exactly the same process I've done on my own cues for 20+ years. I even use the exact same Loctite gel. The newer gel dries fast, maybe 30 seconds, so you have to get the tip on pretty quick, but I can trim the tip within just a few minutes. The only I do different is I use a hand-held Dremel tool for trimming and initial shaping of the tip. I use a 1 inch sanding disc and very carefully sand down the sides of the tip while rotating the cue to trim evenly. Once I'm very close to even with the ferrule, I use the Dremel sanding disc to bevel the top edges of the tip. This makes final shaping to dime or nickel radius much quicker and easier. I then use 600 grit to blend the tip with the ferrule. Finish with 1000 and 1500 grit, and burnish with a small leather piece. Professional results every time. Just don't flinch with the Dremel and gouge a huge hole in your ferrule or shaft.....;)
 

chefjeff

New Green Zone
Silver Member
Has anybody used the williard tipping machine,if so,what did you think about it.

I talked to a local Mueller store guy this past weekend and he told me those are no longer available. He got the last one and now uses it to replace tips here in town vs. sending shafts to Lincoln to be done there.

fyi,



Jeff Livingston
 

crazysnake

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dremel, sharp knife, sand paper 200-4000 grit, CA glue and NCF accelerator, and a piece of cardboard for burnishing.

Sent from my Moto Z2 Play using Tapatalk
 

Snooker Theory

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Great tutorial, though a shame how Photobucket is these days :(

 
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