My first tip install

HueblerHustler7

AndrewActionG
Silver Member
My work on tips, ferrules, and shafts has been coming along nicely. I do not assume I am close to being a pro, so I make myself stay cautious, take time, and continue to learn the nuances of each repair.

Recently I have ventured into two new first-time projects. First has been making joint protectors for my cues. I used my DIY lathe do the majority of the shaping and finished them off using the Mid America Lathe. My first try at it was a solid piece of Purpleheart I shaped into what looks like a couple of pawns. Not perfect, but I think they came out descent. The second set I glued a piece of Canary wood between the Purpleheart. The second attempt came out nicer.

View attachment 659257

View attachment 659258

View attachment 659259


My other project led me to the other end of the cue. I have repaired all the ferrules and tips on the house cues where I play. The other day I noticed a cue in the corner I had missed. This one was in really bad shape. The butt was heavily cracked and hollow for about five inches in. The dumpster was more than likely soon to be its future home. I figured this could be a good practice experiment.

I didn’t find much on how to specifically repair something like this. I know typically a butt sleeve is put onto a tenon coming from the forearm/handle. This is a full splice cue that I am hacking the end off. I guess I could have created a tenon and put it in the cue and then made a butt sleeve, but I decided to just have the tenon be part of the new piece I was making. This seemed simpler so I went with my gut. (Let me know if this was a bad idea). I took an 8-inch piece of Yucatan Rosewood, 3 inches for the tenon and 5 inches for the piece I cut off. I bored 3-inch hole into the cue for the tenon. Once it fit good, I added black and white rings for some pizzaz, and glued it together.

View attachment 659261

After turning down to match the cue’s diameter, I sanded off the old finish and added a recess for the bumper. Next was a new ferrule and tip before giving it a new CA finish, bumper, and waxed shaft.

Done!

I probably could have worked the finish a little bit more, but I knew it was going straight to the house cue rack so perfection wasn't totally necessary. Overall I am pretty happy with the results.

View attachment 659262

View attachment 659263


Great repair work! Keep the sharing! And keep up the great work :) Only thing I could say is try adding some" glue seats" when working with a non threaded tenon. Just cut some small ring notches down the tenon.
 

Guy Manges

Registered
My advice to players new to the Thoroughbred tips is if you are normally used to using 2 tips of english on a shot, only use 1 tip of english to start. Most of the time that is all you will need. The only times I miscue is due to a poor stroke, stretched out or not chalking for several racks. Don't think about the tip, think about the shot. ;)
That squaring to the table is so important... I even see the pros blame their tip... Guy. Thank you Kelly for what you do, I hope the members here will let you do your good job... Guy
 
Last edited:

ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
Thanks for the feedback. I’ve done that with the ferrule before. Should have thought to do that here.

While cutting grooves, cut a couple lengthwise too. Amazing how much pressure you can build up if excess glue and the air has no place to go. Quite possible to split your female component. That particular piece, might have just been sure I drilled a through hole for the bumper screw before assembly. No big deal just one more thing to remember glue and air have to go somewhere.

I was quite pleased with myself when I cut a metal cap to an airtight fit. Then it turned out to be completely airtight, the air wouldn't even seep out over time. Pained me to have to true everything up in the lathe and cut a couple thousandths clearance full circle so the slick and shiney piece actually worked!

Hu
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
While cutting grooves, cut a couple lengthwise too. Amazing how much pressure you can build up if excess glue and the air has no place to go. Quite possible to split your female component. That particular piece, might have just been sure I drilled a through hole for the bumper screw before assembly. No big deal just one more thing to remember glue and air have to go somewhere.

I was quite pleased with myself when I cut a metal cap to an airtight fit. Then it turned out to be completely airtight, the air wouldn't even seep out over time. Pained me to have to true everything up in the lathe and cut a couple thousandths clearance full circle so the slick and shiney piece actually worked!

Hu

Another good point. I realized the need for a relief slot after I got it all glued up and it started to rise out a little from the pressure. I managed to release the pressure by rotating and moving it around until it stopped pushing back. So far, no signs of a problem. I'll remember this for next time.
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Recently I was given two sneaky petes to re-tip. I ended up keeping the purpleheart one for myself, paid in trade :). I figured I could leave it at my favorite local haunt, so if I just stop by and don't have my cue with me, I will have something nicer than a house cue to use. The more I thought about it the more I wanted to do something to it to make it uniquely mine.

This became my next "let's see if I can do it" project. At first, I was just going to add a linen butt cap to protect the bottom better, but then I decided to go all out and make a whole butt sleeve. I used Purpleheart, Yellowheart, black plastic and aluminum rings, and black linen for the buttcap and fat ring. I'm no hustler so removing the "sneakiness" wasn't an issue.

Well, I definitely learned many ways not to do this. Many of my ideas made this much harder than it should have been. I tried to build the entire sleeve, glue it together, and then shape and bore it as one piece. Keeping all the pieces lined up was a real pain. I was worried something was offset enough I wouldn't be able to shape it to the right diameter. I was able to round it off to a preliminary diameter, but while boring it, some of the pieces separated. I bored each piece and just reassembled on the tenon. I do not have a taper machine, so I got it to the final butt cap diameter and sanded the rest to the right taper.

I realize now (and should have from the start) that I need to just turn the wood blanks down to a rod, bore it out, and then cut off the pieces to size. Now it would be easier to assemble and glue on the tenon. Simple.

The other big thing I did wrong was not monitoring the finish close enough and sealed in some flaws between the layers. I ended up sanding it all off and started again.

It is almost done. Here are some pictures. I will add some final pictures as soon as I get back to it.

C51094F7-1C9C-49F9-ABB2-28FF3E79F30A.jpeg


30B43D49-EDF3-402C-9D8F-D7BE2FBEE7E0.jpeg


15C91336-976A-4CA6-B46D-DFCB7958C0DC.jpeg


A94C6978-39BA-4971-A35D-0F72B9419F6A.jpeg


E34DD803-02A3-4DCE-97B6-0A98D30AC78C.jpeg


7E658BC9-5BD5-4E16-B363-F8DAA2A9538F.jpeg


0A313DA9-96DA-40BF-A1A1-5FD711234AD7.jpeg
 
Last edited:

GoldCrown

Pool players have more balls
Gold Member
Silver Member
Recently I was given two sneaky petes to re-tip. I ended up keeping the purpleheart one myself. I figured I could leave it at my favorite local haunt, so if I just stop by and don't have my cue with me, I will have something nicer than a house cue to use. The more I thought about it the more I wanted to do something to it to make it uniquely mine. At first, I was just going to add a linen butt cap, but then I decided to go ahead and make a whole butt sleeve using Purpleheart, Yellowheart, and rings. I'm no hustler so removing the sneakiness wasn't an issue.

Well, I definitely learned many ways not to do this. Many of my ideas made this much harder than it should have been. I tried to build the entire sleeve, glue it together, and then shape and bore it as one piece. Keeping all the pieces lined up was a real pain. I was worried something was offset enough I wouldn't be able to shape it to the right diameter. I was able to round it off to a preliminary diameter, but while boring it, some of the pieces separated. I bored each piece and just reassembled on the tenon. I do not have a taper machine, so I got it to the final butt cap diameter and sanded the rest to the right taper.

I realize now (and should have from the start) that I need to just turn the wood blanks down to a rod, bore it out, and then cut off the pieces to size. Now it would be easier to assemble and glue on the tenon. Simple.

The other big thing I did wrong was not monitoring the finish close enough and sealed in some flaws between the layers. I ended up sanding it all off and started again.

It is almost done. Here are some pictures. I will add some final pictures as soon as I get back to it.

View attachment 671800

View attachment 671801

View attachment 671802

View attachment 671803

View attachment 671804

View attachment 671806

View attachment 671805
Love it. Nice job
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Learn from the mistakes so you can better understand why the correct way, is the correct way.

The butt sleeve ended up turning out pretty nice. The techniques used to build it were wrong (as stated in the previous post), but the result is acceptable.

The finish however is a different story. After refinishing the backend of the cue, I realized the top half now had a totally different color of purple. The part I did on the bottom was revitalized to its more purplish glory, while the older top part had a brownish tint to it. I then had to strip off the top part and re-finish it too. The color is pretty close, but there is a noticeable color difference if you look. I had done another cue this way for a different reason and it worked out fine. Purpleheart must be a bit more sensitive. I need to get or make something to hold the butt in the lathe by the bumper hole so I can just finish the entire cue at once.

Another problem is the purple bled into the maple points. See the last two pictures below. If anyone has any suggestions for avoiding this, I would appreciate it. I didn't notice until after I was done and had the cue in my hands looking down the stick. When looking straight at the side it is much less noticeable, but at an angle you can see it more. I don't know if this was just dust getting in the wood or if the wood's dye actually bled over.

Although it wouldn't be acceptable if I was doing this for someone else, this is my cue and will be fine for my bar stick.

270B6DCF-2F32-4FDD-92FC-0303006A0001.jpeg


35FFB44B-EF6C-4271-8CCF-7660872A7E66.jpeg


Purple bleed is less noticeable from straight on the side.
0522C78C-7CF1-46FB-B3A0-2926DE7B6261.jpeg


More noticeable at an angle
85182612-82E8-45C3-8D7D-75D4B02D006C.jpeg
 
Last edited:

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Took it out for a spin last night. I decided not to put the weight bolt back in and try it out that way. It is at 17.8 so it is a fraction of an ounce less than my Pechauer I normally play with. It has a Medium UltraSkin Ivory tip. I am very impressed with the hit and feel of the cue. The cue's playability and curb appeal are a definite home run.

In addition to what I mentioned above I can further nitpick my first butt sleeve. When some of the pieces came apart while I was boring it, I forgot to realign the grain of the bottom purpleheart piece with the others and there is also a small spot on one black ring where the glue must have lifted off the ring leaving it a little foggy. These are small things that are not really noticeable unless you are up close and personal. Most people will never notice. I am definitely happy with the cue, just bothers me a bit because I want it to be perfect. Still a keeper though!

7A982888-7396-4F9E-9F3C-1C7CA4E040FA.jpeg
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Since I added the new butt to the Purpleheart Meucci (above) I’ve been looking for another cue to do something similar with or maybe try my hand at a joint pin by converting a one piece.

During my search/wait I’ve been continuing with tips and ferrules, and I even made a bocote ring for my girlfriend.

Finally, just what I was looking for. A busted up sneaky needing some love. With the help of AZB'ers it was identified as an old Huebler. The butt was all busted up so this was a perfect candidate for a new butt. Once I finally got the weight bolt out and saw what was under it, I had to figure out what wood and what design.

As a side note before I continue:
  • Can anyone tell me what kind of wood the cue is made of? My guess is walnut, but I don't know enough.
  • I have had good success with CA as a finish. In my searches have seen many recommending Solarez. I would like to hear any opinions on the matter.
  • And as a curiosity other than going from a broken to a fixed cue, does this type of modification increase or decrease the value?

52734518-06DB-4F98-B401-CC63C0013864.jpeg


I settled on Snakewood and African Blackwood as the wood combination with aluminum rings and a brown linen phenolic butt plate, and setout planning the layout and structure, keeping in mind what I learned to not do from the other one I did. I wanted to incorporate the metal bumper cup just for the nostalgia, but in the end, I went without it for structural reasons. This time I did it right and turned the wood down to the right diameter and cored them to the size of the tenon and then cut them into the individual pieces.

2034E790-CFED-4138-BEBE-63E6573A8A5A.jpeg


In creating the tenon some of the length was lost where the metal cup was located. I didn't want to just glue the butt plate out on the end without any support. Using black phenolic I made an extension insert to bridge between the end of the tenon and butt plate to give it some support.

C86DD7B8-F732-47F1-9BC1-2355CB091265.jpeg


Before and after.
D2597C91-CC49-4B10-8C98-EC5C454803CB.jpeg


E6CF26A3-0430-4ECF-B3C0-281485A67EE4.jpeg


AED7937D-B20D-469B-AED2-430ECEBE8BF8.jpeg


After replacing the ferrule with a new Tomohawk and an Ultraskin medium Fire tip, I took it for a spin last night to see how it plays. I know I probably should have tried it out before putting work into it but with the reputation Huebler has, I figured I would take a chance. The tip is 11.85mm I play with a 12.75mm normally and have never played with a smaller tip before. I can say the feel and sound of the hit is very nice. The thinner shaft did feel less stiff than I am used to, but I defiantly give this cue a thumbs up. Now I just need to decide on the finish for the cue. Thanks for looking.

Note: this picture is before finish.
1C030046-4D77-4943-817F-A21B40039D3B.jpeg
 
Last edited:

GoldCrown

Pool players have more balls
Gold Member
Silver Member
Since I added the new butt to the Purpleheart Meucci (above) I’ve been looking for another cue to do something similar with or maybe try my hand at a joint pin by converting a one piece.

During my search/wait I’ve been continuing with tips and ferrules, and I even made a bocote ring for my girlfriend.

Finally, just what I was looking for. A busted up sneaky needing some love. With the help of AZB'ers it was identified as an old Huebler. The butt was all busted up so this was a perfect candidate for a new butt. Once I finally got the weight bolt out and saw what was under it, I had to figure out what wood and what design.

As a side note before I continue:
  • Can anyone tell me what kind of wood the cue is made of? My guess is walnut, but I don't know enough.
  • I have had good success with CA as a finish. In my searches have seen many recommending Solarez. I would like to hear any opinions on the matter.
  • And as a curiosity other than going from a broken to a fixed cue, does this type of modification increase or decrease the value?

View attachment 689734

I settled on Snakewood and African Blackwood as the wood combination with aluminum rings and a brown linen phenolic butt plate, and setout planning the layout and structure, keeping in mind what I learned to not do from the other one I did. I wanted to incorporate the metal bumper cup just for the nostalgia, but in the end, I went without it for structural reasons. This time I did it right and turned the wood down to the right diameter and cored them to the size of the tenon and then cut them into the individual pieces.

View attachment 689735

In creating the tenon some of the length was lost where the metal cup was located. I didn't want to just glue the butt plate out on the end without any support. Using black phenolic I made an extension insert to bridge between the end of the tenon and butt plate to give it some support.

View attachment 689736

Before and after.
View attachment 689741

View attachment 689743

After replacing the ferrule with a new Tomohawk and an Ultraskin medium Fire tip, I took it for a spin last night to see how it plays. I know I probably should have tried it out before putting work into it but with the reputation Huebler has, I figured I would take a chance. The tip is 11.85mm I play with a 12.75mm normally and have never played with a smaller tip before. I can say the feel and sound of the hit is very nice. The thinner shaft did feel less stiff than I am used to, but I defiantly give this cue a thumbs up. Now I just need to decide on the finish for the cue. Thanks for looking.

View attachment 689742
Great project. Pretty nice work. Looking forward to your “pinning” conversation.
Your lathe does not have a taper bar? I’m asking.
 
Last edited:

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
I was hoping to get an answer to the questions in my last post about the Huebler repair.

Especially: Can anyone tell me what kind of wood the cue is made of?
Walnut maybe?
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Great project. Pretty nice work. Looking forward to your “pinning” conversation.
Your lathe does not have a taper bar? I’m asking.
I do not have a taper bar. Wish I did and probably will when I can afford it.
I sanded the taper by checking with a straight edge against the cue.
 

GoldCrown

Pool players have more balls
Gold Member
Silver Member
I do not have a taper bar. Wish I did and probably will when I can afford it.
I sanded the taper by checking with a straight edge against the cue.
Your work looks great. I know your lathe does not have one.. just checking how you turned to dimension. I want to convert a house cue
without a taper bar. Joint and custom butt cap. Anyway keep up the beautiful work. It’s classy, custom and one of a kind.
 
Last edited:

BuffaloSlim

Active member
Building my homemade lathe was a great distraction during the shutdown. In the end it worked for cleaning and tips. My dreams of it doing more were dashed upon the rocks when I tried to replace a ferrule on an old cue. Too much runout. I was at the crossroad of experimenting further to get it to work or just get one that already works. In other words, do I want to work on the lathe or work on the cues. I decided it was a good proof of concept that I liked working on the cues, so I ordered a new Mid America lathe.
Tada!
View attachment 629041

Even though I don’t use them, all the house cues at my main hangout have slip on tips and they drive me crazy watching others use them. Now I see them as practice cues, so I asked the owner, and she gave me the go-ahead. I brought a couple home to fix.

Thought I was going to just pop the tips off, clean it up and put a new tip on. Nope, half the ferrule appeared to have been chopped off and there were big gouges cut into the shaft and ferrule. I assume the gouges may have been for gluing the slip tip on. I removed the ferrule and cut back the shaft to add more tenon for the new ferrule. Great learning experience.

Here is my first ferrule install on the new machine. I’m putting Triangle tips on the house cues.
Note: I forgot to take a picture of the original tip and the damaged ferrule and shaft underneath.

View attachment 629045

View attachment 629046

View attachment 629047

View attachment 629048

View attachment 629049
Lookin good Diver .. good job
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Your work looks great. I know your lathe does not have one.. just checking how you turned to dimension. I want to convert a house cue
without a taper bar. Joint and custom butt cap. Anyway keep up the beautiful work. It’s classy, custom and one of a kind.
Lots of starting and stopping to check the taper with a straight edge and to measure the butt cap with the calipers until I was satisfied. Probably not up to cue maker standards, but I am happy with the results.

E94B910F-F01E-439B-BCD3-FC8DA3FDAF40.jpeg
 
Top