Thinking of calling it a day......

JayRack

Member
Go back to absolute fundamentals. Pretend like you're just starting. A lot of times this will make something click. Its usually something basic that gets ya off-course.
Almost seems like a concentration issue. Today was a bad day. Missing easy shots led to frustration led to mental weakness. Felt I couldn't run five balls.
 

JayRack

Member
In pool you can go through strong periods and weaker periods. Sometimes it actually helps to take a little break. Once a guy starts beating you regularly, it's hard to come back because they are confident and you are not. That factor is big. Just a few nervous mistakes every couple of racks is usually the difference between winning and losing. I would suggest mixing up with different opponents and take a shot at the guy when you are playing your "A" game again.
Right on.
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have played the last several Sundays and my game sucked.

After not having played for so long and then coming back playing in a different pool hall, with tables that play totally different, I was struggling.

The tables at this other pool hall are super fast and the rails are bouncy as hell. You have to really baby your stroke and I am not a fan of that. I don’t like punching and bunting.

The other thing is that I have never spent any time practicing on them. We just go in and start shooting right off the bat. With the COVID now limiting the number of tables in play, the tables have to be reserved and you can only reserve them for two hours at a time and they have a waiting list. Sometimes, when you are just getting a bit used to the table, they will move you to another one.

Another thing I noticed a couple weeks ago was that my perception of the balls didn’t look normal...something was off. Then I realized that almost all the tables are about two inches lower than the tables at Hawaiian Brian’s. In order for me to get the same perception of the balls, that I am used to, I have to lower my stance.

Today, I played much better. I went in and adjusted things to accommodate the differences in the tables.
 

Straightpool_99

I see dead balls
Silver Member
I'm 42. I improved quite a bit at snooker last year, even though I've been playing it for ages. Snooker really is a young mans game, but if I can improve at that, so can you. It's a great idea to try to learn snooker, because you'll learn the weaknesses of your fundamentals.

I mostly worked on long shots, standing completely still and line-up drills. I started working only on my bridge arm, fokusing on relaxing it completely so it wouldn't move. Just a week of that, and improvement started happening. Then I started on my grip. Letting the cue move freely and just forming my hand around it, not letting anything take it off its course. That led to further improvement. I was allready doing these things, but not well enough for a shot the length of a 12 foot table.

Try to run all the reds in line-up with only yellows...That'll keep you busy for a while. It's BRUTALLY tough, even for seasoned players. I'm playing on TV-grade tables (12 foot with extremely tight pockets and fast cloth) and if you don't keep absolutely still and have a straight stroke, you can't run even a 30 break with consistency. When you gradually go from 30-50-70-100 it's really rewarding. Apart from straight pool, pool games often do not show your progression as well as snooker. While practising for a championship, I played only snooker for about 3 months, and when I returned to pool the tables looked like a joke. Sadly that feeling doesn't last, but it's eye-opening for sure. I've always moved back and forth, but focusing on snooker only for a while, really did teach me a lot.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pretty perplexed with my game. I'm not playing up to my abilities. I was playing even and sometimes beating a local road player 3 months ago and now he can give me the wild 8. My game is going backwards. I was thinking of getting an instructor as a last ditch effort or maybe I should just sell all my cues and move on from the game I've become so frustrated with. Any advice?
The wild 8 isn't exactly the world...I give that just to get a bet sometimes. We all have a range of ability. The purpose of practice and a strong metal game is being able to be at the top of that range more often and being able to get there when the pressure is on.
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
And it is also important to acknowledge that your level of play isn't a single measure, it is a range from your best to your worst.

Players are fond of believing they play as well as they did at their best but that isn't reality, it is a peak and it really isn't realistic to believe you will always be able to come with that skill level when playing.

Get real and quit whining. Shut up and work it out.
 

philly

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Play by yourself.
I have said it a million times.
Hit a million balls.
Just work through it.
It happens.
Doubt is the biggest killer of all.
Sounds like you might be in that rut, doubting your abilities.
Practice yourself and build that confidence back up.
You might be beating yourself with doubt.
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you quit playing pool, other than for health reasons, you are throwing in the towel.
It means you lost your love for the game, presuming you actually had it at one time.

Dunno about you but pool is part of my past. Not sure how much pool is in my future.
But as long as my health allows, pool will remain part of my life because it’s who I am.
 

ribdoner

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Silver Member
If you quit playing pool, other than for health reasons, you are throwing in the towel.
It means you lost your love for the game, presuming you actually had it at one time.

Dunno about you but pool is part of my past. Not sure how much pool is in my future.
But as long as my health allows, pool will remain part of my life because it’s who I am.

improvement in pool isn't a straight line progression, esp if you aren't play an avg of 6+ hours p/day

i've found that working on basics and determining why your not playing well in order to take corrective action will get you on the right track

when playing poorly i tend to "push' the QB instead "striking'punching" the QB

i also don't focus on the exact contact point on the OB and/or where i'm striking the QB

continue to play the "right" way to include using IE, leaving yourself little more difficult shot vs attempting "hero" shape, shooting 2 way shots when feasable, prepare to play by warming up, etc

BAVAFONGOUL, i quoted you by mistake instead of making a general statement, sorry
 

Tin Man

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I could help you improve your level of play but I don't think that would help. The issue isn't your level of play, it is tying performance to happiness.

Too many people make this mistake. When someone equates performance with pleasure they become result oriented and begin to resent all of the challenges on the table, because those are obstacles between them and the achievement they believe they need to be happy. Their quest to improve and earn happiness has made them miserable, frustrated and burned out.

Instead you can let that go and play to enjoy the challenge. When you play to have fun you win as soon as you put your cue stick together. The happiness isn't on the other side of a barrier we must cross. There is no barrier and no happiness anywhere but the here and now. Happiness can be found only with enjoying the challenges and difficulty of the game. When we learn to dissociate performance from enjoyment we can enjoy whatever the day brings. And the funny thing is that when we rekindle our childlike mindset where we enjoy the challenges the game brings, we tend to play better and our performance follows. Performance follows state of mind, state of mind shouldn't follow performance.

I thought about a time I raced with my kids. We were walking across the park and I shouted "I'll race you to that tree over there!" Immediately we began to run. Next thing you know there was laughter, my kids were shouting at me they were gaining on me, I fell down on purpose and they passed me, then I started gaining on them and they were shouting and running. What was the point of the race? To enjoy it for itself. What was at the tree? Was there some payoff? Some reward? Some "Look at me, I reached the tree, I'm so special"? No. The tree was pointless. It didn't matter. It was there to provide a stage for us to enjoy a race together.

Pool is no different. Yes we need goals and we should strive towards them, but if you hate the journey there is no payoff upon reaching those goals that makes up for years of misery, whereas if you enjoy the pursuit of those goals then you don't need to even reach them or waste time looking for some external payoff.

I speak about this a little in my link below. I am fueled by wonder and enthusiasm, I enjoy every session I put in, and my game has always followed. II wish all of you could experience the game how I do. So if you want to enjoy the game again I suggest you listen and feel free to PM me if you want to chat. Whichever way you go I wish you the best.

 

JayRack

Member
I could help you improve your level of play but I don't think that would help. The issue isn't your level of play, it is tying performance to happiness.

Too many people make this mistake. When someone equates performance with pleasure they become result oriented and begin to resent all of the challenges on the table, because those are obstacles between them and the achievement they believe they need to be happy. Their quest to improve and earn happiness has made them miserable, frustrated and burned out.

Instead you can let that go and play to enjoy the challenge. When you play to have fun you win as soon as you put your cue stick together. The happiness isn't on the other side of a barrier we must cross. There is no barrier and no happiness anywhere but the here and now. Happiness can be found only with enjoying the challenges and difficulty of the game. When we learn to dissociate performance from enjoyment we can enjoy whatever the day brings. And the funny thing is that when we rekindle our childlike mindset where we enjoy the challenges the game brings, we tend to play better and our performance follows. Performance follows state of mind, state of mind shouldn't follow performance.

I thought about a time I raced with my kids. We were walking across the park and I shouted "I'll race you to that tree over there!" Immediately we began to run. Next thing you know there was laughter, my kids were shouting at me they were gaining on me, I fell down on purpose and they passed me, then I started gaining on them and they were shouting and running. What was the point of the race? To enjoy it for itself. What was at the tree? Was there some payoff? Some reward? Some "Look at me, I reached the tree, I'm so special"? No. The tree was pointless. It didn't matter. It was there to provide a stage for us to enjoy a race together.

Pool is no different. Yes we need goals and we should strive towards them, but if you hate the journey there is no payoff upon reaching those goals that makes up for years of misery, whereas if you enjoy the pursuit of those goals then you don't need to even reach them or waste time looking for some external payoff.

I speak about this a little in my link below. I am fueled by wonder and enthusiasm, I enjoy every session I put in, and my game has always followed. II wish all of you could experience the game how I do. So if you want to enjoy the game again I suggest you listen and feel free to PM me if you want to chat. Whichever way you go I wish you the best.

Ver
I could help you improve your level of play but I don't think that would help. The issue isn't your level of play, it is tying performance to happiness.

Too many people make this mistake. When someone equates performance with pleasure they become result oriented and begin to resent all of the challenges on the table, because those are obstacles between them and the achievement they believe they need to be happy. Their quest to improve and earn happiness has made them miserable, frustrated and burned out.

Instead you can let that go and play to enjoy the challenge. When you play to have fun you win as soon as you put your cue stick together. The happiness isn't on the other side of a barrier we must cross. There is no barrier and no happiness anywhere but the here and now. Happiness can be found only with enjoying the challenges and difficulty of the game. When we learn to dissociate performance from enjoyment we can enjoy whatever the day brings. And the funny thing is that when we rekindle our childlike mindset where we enjoy the challenges the game brings, we tend to play better and our performance follows. Performance follows state of mind, state of mind shouldn't follow performance.

I thought about a time I raced with my kids. We were walking across the park and I shouted "I'll race you to that tree over there!" Immediately we began to run. Next thing you know there was laughter, my kids were shouting at me they were gaining on me, I fell down on purpose and they passed me, then I started gaining on them and they were shouting and running. What was the point of the race? To enjoy it for itself. What was at the tree? Was there some payoff? Some reward? Some "Look at me, I reached the tree, I'm so special"? No. The tree was pointless. It didn't matter. It was there to provide a stage for us to enjoy a race together.

Pool is no different. Yes we need goals and we should strive towards them, but if you hate the journey there is no payoff upon reaching those goals that makes up for years of misery, whereas if you enjoy the pursuit of those goals then you don't need to even reach them or waste time looking for some external payoff.

I speak about this a little in my link below. I am fueled by wonder and enthusiasm, I enjoy every session I put in, and my game has always followed. II wish all of you could experience the game how I do. So if you want to enjoy the game again I suggest you listen and feel free to PM me if you want to chat. Whichever way you go I wish you the best.

Spot on. There is no question winning or losing dictates the rest of my night. If I lose a match and get home at 8 pm I'm absolutely miserable from 8 till I go to bed.... If I win I'm on cloud 9 for the rest of the night PARTICULARLY when I've played my road player rival and I'll add that it bothers the shit out of me that I'm getting weight now.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... There is no question winning or losing dictates the rest of my night. ...
If you enjoy reading, I suggest you try The Inner Game of Tennis and The Pleasures of Small Motions. They are not for everyone, but some find them useful for enjoying the game more. I think they can also help with your actual performance.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
I could help you improve your level of play but I don't think that would help. The issue isn't your level of play, it is tying performance to happiness.

Too many people make this mistake. When someone equates performance with pleasure they become result oriented and begin to resent all of the challenges on the table, because those are obstacles between them and the achievement they believe they need to be happy. Their quest to improve and earn happiness has made them miserable, frustrated and burned out.

Instead you can let that go and play to enjoy the challenge. When you play to have fun you win as soon as you put your cue stick together. The happiness isn't on the other side of a barrier we must cross. There is no barrier and no happiness anywhere but the here and now. Happiness can be found only with enjoying the challenges and difficulty of the game. When we learn to dissociate performance from enjoyment we can enjoy whatever the day brings. And the funny thing is that when we rekindle our childlike mindset where we enjoy the challenges the game brings, we tend to play better and our performance follows. Performance follows state of mind, state of mind shouldn't follow performance.

I thought about a time I raced with my kids. We were walking across the park and I shouted "I'll race you to that tree over there!" Immediately we began to run. Next thing you know there was laughter, my kids were shouting at me they were gaining on me, I fell down on purpose and they passed me, then I started gaining on them and they were shouting and running. What was the point of the race? To enjoy it for itself. What was at the tree? Was there some payoff? Some reward? Some "Look at me, I reached the tree, I'm so special"? No. The tree was pointless. It didn't matter. It was there to provide a stage for us to enjoy a race together.

Pool is no different. Yes we need goals and we should strive towards them, but if you hate the journey there is no payoff upon reaching those goals that makes up for years of misery, whereas if you enjoy the pursuit of those goals then you don't need to even reach them or waste time looking for some external payoff.

I speak about this a little in my link below. I am fueled by wonder and enthusiasm, I enjoy every session I put in, and my game has always followed. II wish all of you could experience the game how I do. So if you want to enjoy the game again I suggest you listen and feel free to PM me if you want to chat. Whichever way you go I wish you the best.

I'd call this one of your best ever posts on this forum, and given the generally high quality of your AZB content, that's a very strong statement.

Those who don't enjoy the journey, and all of its up and downs and ebbs and flows, don't love pool the way you and I do.
 

Tin Man

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'd call this one of your best ever posts on this forum, and given the generally high quality of your AZB content, that's a very strong statement.

Those who don't enjoy the journey, and all of its up and downs and ebbs and flows, don't love pool the way you and I do.
Thank you Stu! Looking forward to our next meal together!
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The standard advice from the counter at the pool hall, when a player is down on their game: "Take two week off, and then quit".

:D:D:D:D:D
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Why can’t you enjoy the journey and tie in performance and happiness?

I work at my game and am always intrigued by what I learn on a weekly basis. But I also care about performance and playing well (sometimes) is a source of happiness for me. I don’t see that those are mutually exclusive.

Lou Figueroa
 
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