Unknown "monster" players

Raggedy Andy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Weldon

Weldon Rogers was one of the best players ever on the old Valleys with the big apple. He also played jam up one handed. One of his side kicks, James Christopher was also a good player. But, if you ask me, there were plenty of good road players back then that stayed under the radar. It was much different back then.
 

Badbeat13

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This thread is awesome and I've only read the first seven pages so far. Thanks OP for the great read within this thread.
 

8onthesnap

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Rob piersa down at Yale billiards in Wallingford ct is pretty lights out. His buddy Dave ain't bad either
 

wagdad

Yup, I'm that Guy.
Silver Member
If any of you are ever in the detroit area, stop down to the blue diamond in mexican town on mondays. shane van boening was there 6 months ago. But as fas an unknown, I was introduced silently to a man known simply as black Kenny, A+++ player.
 

DoubleA

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This thread is awesome and I've only read the first seven pages so far. Thanks OP for the great read within this thread.
Thanks, enjoy, many of the names on here(Weldon "Jr" Rogers, Vernon Elliot, etc.) were personal friends of mine. Jr still is, others too numerous to list. We have lost too many in the last couple of years.
 
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ginsu

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I read this and nobody mentioned a little guy that they called "STORMIN NORMAN" (Norm Wines). He is from Michigan and he came through Cincinnati and beat everybody......I watched him give a guy the 8 and Norm had to shoot behind his back.....Norm played better shooting behind his back than most of the players in Cincinnati.....He was a pretty cool guy to BS with.

Norm is not little, from Battle Creek. Great player.
 

bondsman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Would Bob Ogburn be considered "unknown"? How well did he play? Doe anyone on here remember a guy from Pheonix name Rudy? I saw Jackie Madden said he died a few years ago. Rudy told me he once beat Ronnie Allen playing 9 ball in Ca. I never heard Rudy lie or brag so I believed him
 

Stone Cold

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If any of you are ever in the detroit area, stop down to the blue diamond in mexican town on mondays. shane van boening was there 6 months ago. But as fas an unknown, I was introduced silently to a man known simply as black Kenny, A+++ player.

Detroit Kenny is a pretty good player. We saw him at SBE a couple years ago. I think he's a little known though
 

huckster

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Speaking of Michigan what ever happened to Kirkwood before he came out of the woodwork he was unknown seem him make some great games even getting weight from guys he was supposed to spot
 

Badbeat13

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks, enjoy, many of the names on here(Weldon "Jr" Rogers, Vernon Elliot, etc.) were personal friends of mine. Jr still is, others too numerous to list. We have lost too many in the last couple of years.

Unfortunately, none of us will outrun that roll. Sad, but true DoubleA. I would have loved to have seen all the great players within this thread in action, but a lot of them have gone on. Fortunately for us, they left behind a legacy and many great stories to be told.
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There is a good story of him losing to Kid Delicious...I think it was 40 games in a row at $50 a game. I remember reading that and thinking...wow this Cheyenne Pete had some heart.

Yep, but pete was waaaaaaaaaaay past his prime and the Kid was In his prime.
 

JAM

Professional Railbird
Silver Member
Michael "Geese" Gerace was the best one-handed player I'd ever seen. He could draw his rock the length of the table without his cue touching a rail. That's pretty strong. :cool:

In the '80s era, we got a call from a mayor of a town up in Pennsylvania who happened to like staking pool players. Geese and I had been up in that region before hustling, and we met the mayor. He took us around a few spots. I remember one bar in Morgantown, WV that had a ton of action, and the town of Morgantown had a pool room that you walked downstairs to, just like on that movie "The Hustler." :p

Anyway, one day Geese got a call from the mayor who said he wanted Geese to come up right away, that he'd pay him $200 to just show up, win or lose. Apparently, there was a stranger in town looking for action. ;)

Geese and I wasted no time packing, and we were on the road again. It was only about a 3-hour drive. When we got to town, though, it was on a Sunday, and wouldn't you know that all the pool spots were closed in this region, except one bowling alley in Altoona. The mayor negotiated the logistics, and we were to all meet at this bowling alley in Altoona.

Off we went. We got there first, with the mayor in tow, and Geese started hitting balls. An hour goes by, and we're thinking that the stranger in town was going to be a no-show. But then he pops in with his entourage and doesn't even check out the table. He had long straggily blond hair and was wearing boots. Most pool players in this generation of action men wore Nikes or tennis shoes. Nobody wore boots, unless they were from Texas, and these were some odd-looking boots, just about as scraggily as his hair. He pulls a coin out of his pocket and said, "Call it. Heads or tails." :grin-square:

Well, anybody who knows Geese is aware that he cannot tolerate losing to anyone. When he can't stay in the lead in a match, he has a meltdown, similar to Earl Strickland, but in Geese's case, it can get violent. I saw him throw a 9-ball across the pool room as hard as he could in the Maryland State Championship one time as he was racking the balls. Fortunately, it didn't hit anybody. I remember Cigar Tom's (Tom Vanover) wife saying to me, "If that was my man, I'd break that cue stick over his head." :embarrassed2:

The match was a race to 10, if memory serves me right, for $1,000, 9-ball on a Brunswick 9-footer. Now, 9-ball was *not* Geese's best game, but he could keep up with the best of 'em when it came to action. It was a brutal match to watch in the beginning. The stranger would win one, and then Geese would win two. The stranger would win two, and then Geese would win one. Back and forth, back and forth. I could see the blood boiling in Geese's neck veins, and I started to wonder where the nearest Greyhound station was, so I could get a ride home. No way was I getting in the car with him if he lost. :(

Then, like a streak of greatness for Geese or a lack of endurance from the stranger, Geese surged forward and won the match. I remember the stranger never smiled. He unscrewed his cue and left as fast as he blew in town. Geese was happy, and so was I. We drove off into the sunset with a little more cheese than we came with, and that was always a good thing. :thumbup:

20 years or more later, I returned to the pool scene and went to a tournament at some bar in Maryland, close to the Ocean City. I can't remember the name, but they were having a big pool tournament there. A local kid named Cutty was popular at this time, and he could play, loved action too, to include poker. The finals came down to Cutty and this out-of-towner I'd never seen before. The people I came with got knocked out. I was running a poker game back in my hotel room, whiuch was a suite up the road, but I wanted to sweat the finals and pull for Cutty to win, mainly because I was hoping he'd come back to my suite and play poker, giving us a chance to bust him. ;)

Well, Cutty lost, but he still came to my poker game. The out-of-towner ended up being a strong player. I watched him collecting his dough, wondering if I should approach him and invite him to play in my poker game. As I walked up to him, I looked down at his feet, and I couldn't believe my eyes. He was wearing the most god-awful ugly boots I'd ever seen, and then it hit me. I stared at his face and asked him about Altoona. I soon found out that I was standing in front of the legendary Scotty Townsend. What a small pool world it is sometimes! :embarrassed2:

In 2006, Keith and I drove to Las Vegas for an IPT event, and Keith and Scotty, it turns out, were good buddies. I couldn't believe this guy was the same Scotty Townsend I had previously run into. What a hunk Scotty Townsend is today, a really nice-looking gentleman. Who'd ever think this guy was a road agent! :grin-loving:
 

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peteypooldude

I see Edges
Silver Member
Michael "Geese" Gerace was the best one-handed player I'd ever seen. He could draw his rock the length of the table without his cue touching a rail. That's pretty strong. :cool:

In the '80s era, we got a call from a mayor of a town up in Pennsylvania who happened to like staking pool players. Geese and I had been up in that region before hustling, and we met the mayor. He took us around a few spots. I remember one bar in Morgantown, WV that had a ton of action, and the town of Morgantown had a pool room that you walked downstairs to, just like on that movie "The Hustler." :p

Anyway, one day Geese got a call from the mayor who said he wanted Geese to come up right away, that he'd pay him $200 to just show up, win or lose. Apparently, there was a stranger in town looking for action. ;)

Geese and I wasted no time packing, and we were on the road again. It was only about a 3-hour drive. When we got to town, though, it was on a Sunday, and wouldn't you know that all the pool spots were closed in this region, except one bowling alley in Altoona. The mayor negotiated the logistics, and we were to all meet at this bowling alley in Altoona.

Off we went. We got there first, with the mayor in tow, and Geese started hitting balls. An hour goes by, and we're thinking that the stranger in town was going to be a no-show. But then he pops in with his entourage and doesn't even check out the table. He had long straggily blond hair and was wearing boots. Most pool players in this generation of action men wore Nikes or tennis shoes. Nobody wore boots, unless they were from Texas, and these were some odd-looking boots, just about as scraggily as his hair. He pulls a coin out of his pocket and said, "Call it. Heads or tails." :grin-square:

Well, anybody who knows Geese is aware that he cannot tolerate losing to anyone. When he can't stay in the lead in a match, he has a meltdown, similar to Earl Strickland, but in Geese's case, it can get violent. I saw him throw a 9-ball across the pool room as hard as he could in the Maryland State Championship one time as he was racking the balls. Fortunately, it didn't hit anybody. I remember Cigar Tom's (Tom Vanover) wife saying to me, "If that was my man, I'd break that cue stick over his head." :embarrassed2:

The match was a race to 10, if memory serves me right, for $1,000, 9-ball on a Brunswick 9-footer. Now, 9-ball was *not* Geese's best game, but he could keep up with the best of 'em when it came to action. It was a brutal match to watch in the beginning. The stranger would win one, and then Geese would win two. The stranger would win two, and then Geese would win one. Back and forth, back and forth. I could see the blood boiling in Geese's neck veins, and I started to wonder where the nearest Greyhound station was, so I could get a ride home. No way was I getting in the car with him if he lost. :(

Then, like a streak of greatness for Geese or a lack of endurance from the stranger, Geese surged forward and won the match. I remember the stranger never smiled. He unscrewed his cue and left as fast as he blew in town. Geese was happy, and so was I. We drove off into the sunset with a little more cheese than we came with, and that was always a good thing. :thumbup:

20 years or more later, I returned to the pool scene and went to a tournament at some bar in Maryland, close to the Ocean City. I can't remember the name, but they were having a big pool tournament there. A local kid named Cutty was popular at this time, and he could play, loved action too, to include poker. The finals came down to Cutty and this out-of-towner I'd never seen before. The people I came with got knocked out. I was running a poker game back in my hotel room, whiuch was a suite up the road, but I wanted to sweat the finals and pull for Cutty to win, mainly because I was hoping he'd come back to my suite and play poker, giving us a chance to bust him. ;)

Well, Cutty lost, but he still came to my poker game. The out-of-towner ended up being a strong player. I watched him collecting his dough, wondering if I should approach him and invite him to play in my poker game. As I walked up to him, I looked down at his feet, and I couldn't believe my eyes. He was wearing the most god-awful ugly boots I'd ever seen, and then it hit me. I stared at his face and asked him about Altoona. I soon found out that I was standing in front of the legendary Scotty Townsend. What a small pool world it is sometimes! :embarrassed2:

In 2006, Keith and I drove to Las Vegas for an IPT event, and Keith and Scotty, it turns out, were good buddies. I couldn't believe this guy was the same Scotty Townsend I had previously run into. What a hunk Scotty Townsend is today, a really nice-looking gentleman. Who'd ever think this guy was a road agent! :grin-loving:


Scotty is a hell of a character and nice guy. I got to hang out with Scotty and listen to road stories a couple of years ago. I have sat and talked with more pros than I can remember but Scotty is one of a kind. He was wearing a jean shirt with the sleeves ripped off and cowboy boots. He still played like a champion and is one of the friendliest people I have ever met.
I hope I run into him again one day soon
 

JoeyA

Efren's Mini-Tourn BACKER
Silver Member
Great Story!

Michael "Geese" Gerace was the best one-handed player I'd ever seen. He could draw his rock the length of the table without his cue touching a rail. That's pretty strong. :cool:

In the '80s era, we got a call from a mayor of a town up in Pennsylvania who happened to like staking pool players. Geese and I had been up in that region before hustling, and we met the mayor. He took us around a few spots. I remember one bar in Morgantown, WV that had a ton of action, and the town of Morgantown had a pool room that you walked downstairs to, just like on that movie "The Hustler."
Anyway, one day Geese got a call from the mayor who said he wanted Geese to come up right away, that he'd pay him $200 to just show up, win or lose. Apparently, there was a stranger in town looking for action. ;)

Geese and I wasted no time packing, and we were on the road again. It was only about a 3-hour drive. When we got to town, though, it was on a Sunday, and wouldn't you know that all the pool spots were closed in this region, except one bowling alley in Altoona. The mayor negotiated the logistics, and we were to all meet at this bowling alley in Altoona.

Off we went. We got there first, with the mayor in tow, and Geese started hitting balls. An hour goes by, and we're thinking that the stranger in town was going to be a no-show. But then he pops in with his entourage and doesn't even check out the table. He had long straggily blond hair and was wearing boots. Most pool players in this generation of action men wore Nikes or tennis shoes. Nobody wore boots, unless they were from Texas, and these were some odd-looking boots, just about as scraggily as his hair. He pulls a coin out of his pocket and said, "Call it. Heads or tails." :grin-square:

Well, anybody who knows Geese is aware that he cannot tolerate losing to anyone. When he can't stay in the lead in a match, he has a meltdown, similar to Earl Strickland, but in Geese's case, it can get violent. I saw him throw a 9-ball across the pool room as hard as he could in the Maryland State Championship one time as he was racking the balls. Fortunately, it didn't hit anybody. I remember Cigar Tom's (Tom Vanover) wife saying to me, "If that was my man, I'd break that cue stick over his head." :embarrassed2:

The match was a race to 10, if memory serves me right, for $1,000, 9-ball on a Brunswick 9-footer. Now, 9-ball was *not* Geese's best game, but he could keep up with the best of 'em when it came to action. It was a brutal match to watch in the beginning. The stranger would win one, and then Geese would win two. The stranger would win two, and then Geese would win one. Back and forth, back and forth. I could see the blood boiling in Geese's neck veins, and I started to wonder where the nearest Greyhound station was, so I could get a ride home. No way was I getting in the car with him if he lost. :(

Then, like a streak of greatness for Geese or a lack of endurance from the stranger, Geese surged forward and won the match. I remember the stranger never smiled. He unscrewed his cue and left as fast as he blew in town. Geese was happy, and so was I. We drove off into the sunset with a little more cheese than we came with, and that was always a good thing. :thumbup:

20 years or more later, I returned to the pool scene and went to a tournament at some bar in Maryland, close to the Ocean City. I can't remember the name, but they were having a big pool tournament there. A local kid named Cutty was popular at this time, and he could play, loved action too, to include poker. The finals came down to Cutty and this out-of-towner I'd never seen before. The people I came with got knocked out. I was running a poker game back in my hotel room, whiuch was a suite up the road, but I wanted to sweat the finals and pull for Cutty to win, mainly because I was hoping he'd come back to my suite and play poker, giving us a chance to bust him. ;)

Well, Cutty lost, but he still came to my poker game. The out-of-towner ended up being a strong player. I watched him collecting his dough, wondering if I should approach him and invite him to play in my poker game. As I walked up to him, I looked down at his feet, and I couldn't believe my eyes. He was wearing the most god-awful ugly boots I'd ever seen, and then it hit me. I stared at his face and asked him about Altoona. I soon found out that I was standing in front of the legendary Scotty Townsend. What a small pool world it is sometimes! :embarrassed2:

In 2006, Keith and I drove to Las Vegas for an IPT event, and Keith and Scotty, it turns out, were good buddies. I couldn't believe this guy was the same Scotty Townsend I had previously run into. What a hunk Scotty Townsend is today, a really nice-looking gentleman. Who'd ever think this guy was a road agent! :grin-loving:

It's hard to dislike a guy like Scotty even if he beats you out of your dough. :D
 

CJ Wiley

ESPN WORLD OPEN CHAMPION
Gold Member
Silver Member
He might be able to spot "Crocodile Dundee" the Wild 8.

It's hard to dislike a guy like Scotty even if he beats you out of your dough. :D

Scotty is a character to say the least. We've played in 5 different states and bet on each other in a few others.

In 86 Scotty and I were in Las Vegas, and after I won the World Series of Tavern Pool, Scotty and I were hanging out drinking a "few" White Russians when several of the California, Mexican Bar Table Champions surrounded us wanting to gamble.

I was way to buzzed to play, but Scotty said "I'll play all of you, just line up!" and preceded to play one after another as I fought to stay awake using one of the bar tables as a "recliner".

Scotty woke me out of my nap and said "let's go to the bar, they're done!"....I tried to focus my eyes trying to get my bearings "did we win?" .....Scotty smiled "hell, yeah, I busted all of em"....well, that gave me a second wind and we were off to the next adventure in Las Vegas.

Scotty's the only pool player that likes alligator as much as I do, only he actually wrestles them in Louisiana. ;) He might be able to spot "Crocodile Dundee" the Wild 8. :thumbup:
 

richiebalto

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Scotty is a character to say the least. We've played in 5 different states and bet on each other in a few others.

In 86 Scotty and I were in Las Vegas, and after I won the World Series of Tavern Pool, Scotty and I were hanging out drinking a "few" White Russians when several of the California, Mexican Bar Table Champions surrounded us wanting to gamble.

I was way to buzzed to play, but Scotty said "I'll play all of you, just line up!" and preceded to play one after another as I fought to stay awake using one of the bar tables as a "recliner".

Scotty woke me out of my nap and said "let's go to the bar, they're done!"....I tried to focus my eyes trying to get my bearings "did we win?" .....Scotty smiled "hell, yeah, I busted all of em"....well, that gave me a second wind and we were off to the next adventure in Las Vegas.

Scotty's the only pool player that likes alligator as much as I do, only he actually wrestles them in Louisiana. ;) He might be able to spot "Crocodile Dundee" the Wild 8. :thumbup:

Cj, do you remember playing a road player at the Flamingo lounge (Dales place) about 15-20 years ago, well they was suppose to stay away from you and Buddy Hall, Cigar Tom Vanover was the player, only thing was Tom didnt know what you looked like, only your name, Tom beat everybody he played on that road trip except you know who!

Toms road partners took off for awile and left him alone, Tom didnt really know who the players were on the road and he didnt probably care who he played, but when Toms partners came back they told him who he was playing and asked him how he stood and what was he playing for, at that time Tom was holding his own for 50 or 100 a game and then they played a race, well Cj destroyed Tom 2 straight races for 500 or more, i believe.

They headed back towards Baltimore after that session!
 
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