Dime Radius or Nickel Radius?

Dime Radius or Nickel Radius; which do you prefer and why?

  • Dime

    Votes: 39 44.8%
  • Nickel

    Votes: 33 37.9%
  • Doesn't matter to me

    Votes: 15 17.2%

  • Total voters
    87
  • Poll closed .

DJSTEVEZ

Professor of Human Moves
Silver Member
TipRadius-Comparison.jpg
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I use a dime radius (or maybe a bit tighter radius.)

More spin, less forgiving--causing me to have to shoot more deliberately.
 

The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
Meh...
Depends on the diameter of the ferrule for me. My 12.5 tip has a nickle-ish arc. A dime looks goofy. My 11.8 tip could be either but it's too small to tell. Totally psychological...
 

West Point 1987

On the Hill, Out of Gas
Silver Member
Years ago somebody pointed out that the closer the radius of a tip is to the radial arc of the surface of a cue ball, the better the contact/grip it is. For most sizes of tips that's a nickel. I don't know, but I've always had better results from a nickel radius. I also learned to quit grinding my tip to try and keep a specific radius, the chalking action and the thousands of impacts your tip takes will keep your tip in an optimal radius that fits how you're hitting the ball. Once a tip gets "seasoned" during play, it keeps that same radius for me throughout its life.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Years ago somebody pointed out that the closer the radius of a tip is to the radial arc of the surface of a cue ball, the better the contact/grip it is.
Any curvature flatter than about a quarter (12.13mm radius) and you're hitting on the tip's edge before you get to maximum tip offset. In order to have at least 60 degrees of arc (30 degrees per side, to reach the miscue limit), the tip's curvature must have a radius no more than its width.

Here are the radii of some common US coins and the minimum tip widths they work on:

dime (8.95mm) - 9mm tip
penny (9.52mm) - 10mm tip
nickel (10.60mm) - 11mm tip
quarter (12.13mm) - 12.5mm tip

For a tip curvature the same as a ball (1 1/8” radius), you'd need a tip at least 1 1/8" wide.

My tip is 9-10mm and I use a dime shape.

pj
chgo
 
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HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Years ago somebody pointed out that the closer the radius of a tip is to the radial arc of the surface of a cue ball, the better the contact/grip it is. For most sizes of tips that's a nickel. I don't know, but I've always had better results from a nickel radius. I also learned to quit grinding my tip to try and keep a specific radius, the chalking action and the thousands of impacts your tip takes will keep your tip in an optimal radius that fits how you're hitting the ball. Once a tip gets "seasoned" during play, it keeps that same radius for me throughout its life.
I prefer the nickel.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Years ago somebody pointed out that the closer the radius of a tip is to the radial arc of the surface of a cue ball, the better the contact/grip it is. ...
I think the "best" is actually flatter than that, such as totally flat. The problem is that it's really tough to spin the cue ball with a flat tip.

Most tips don't have a single curvature. They are flatter in the center and more rounded on the edges, like an ellipse.

A complication is that the tip doesn't hold its shape during contact. See what happens at 30 seconds into this video:

 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Silver Member
I don't think any of these differences are real.

PJ....there are certain power spin shots I can’t do with a tip that‘s too flat.
The hit of a round tip means the force of the shot is closer to the center of the shaft....for the power.
...you might be able to express this better...whether you agree or not.
I only know it by experience...I can do that Jimmy Moore/Mike Massey draw shot down the rail...
...if somebody hands me their cue to see the shot, I look at their tip...if it’s too flat, I can’t do it.
 
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JusticeNJ

Four Points/Steel Joints
Gold Member
Silver Member
I use the smaller size of the Ultimate Tip Tool, which scuffs the sides of the tip and generally leaves the top untouched. Then, I use the sides of the UTT to scuff the top. I guess I have a compound radius approximating $0.15 of curvature.
 

pooldawg8

My Pride and Joy
Gold Member
Silver Member
I`ve tried using a dime radius yrs ago, but now a days I prefer the nickel radius.
Just my personal thoughts
 
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