Do you use stun run-through?

JessEm

AzB Goldmember
Silver Member
All the time.

As I got better, I started using it without even realizing.

Later, I met with an instructor, who validated the "stun follow" as being one of the 5 core shots.

It's an especially dangerous tool for "steering" the cueball on cut shots. Usually on OBs that are roughly >1/3rd-ball or fuller. But these are not easy to get the feel for. I'm most effective when I'm in the zone, to the point that I'm not even really thinking about how to do it.
 
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easy-e

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'd like to play most of you guys....the knowledge is just underwhelming.
I'll spot the world's leading physicist 9 games in a race to 11. Knowledge of physics and playing ability aren't necessarily related.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'll spot the world's leading physicist 9 games in a race to 11. Knowledge of physics and playing ability aren't necessarily related.
So how does forward stun work...since you are in the camp that the cueball only goes forward through a ball because of topspin?

I must be a magician cause I can stun a ball forward a foot with center ball on a long straight to near straight shot.
 

Straightpool_99

I see dead balls
Silver Member
So how does forward stun work...since you are in the camp that the cueball only goes forward through a ball because of topspin?

I must be a magician cause I can stun a ball forward a foot with center ball on a long straight to near straight shot.
I'd love to show you high speed video,but no access to a pool table for a year...Basically, with normal cueballs that are equal in weight to the object ball, the cueball stops completely dead when you hit the object ball dead straight in. All the forward momentum is transferred to the object ball. If you hit the ball slowly, the object ball will move slowly, if you hit it at break speed, the object ball will move at a very high speed. If the cueball has no spin on it, there will be zero difference in the behavior of the cueball, it will stop dead. If the cueball has any spin on it at all it will spin in place, then grab the cloth and move forward or backwards. You can see it with the naked eye when you hit a powerful draw stroke and the cueball hesitates, then comes back. This is true for stun-follow as well. When you're straight in, what determines the length of forward travel is the spin on the ball. So if you have a lot of spin, the ball will roll longer. You can have a lot of spin on a slow shot if you just roll the ball. You can have very little spin on a very hard shot and move forward 1/2 rotation, so you have a huge range to select from to get the travel you want.

I don't blame you for getting this wrong, because there is a lot of misinformation about this subject. Especially in snooker, people think you can "power the cueball" through the object ball with a stun. As long as the cueball is regulation size and weight (and doesn't jump or something) this just isn't possible. When straight in, you must have spin to move the cueball in any direction, so long as you hit only one object ball.
 
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easy-e

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So how does forward stun work...since you are in the camp that the cueball only goes forward through a ball because of topspin?

I must be a magician cause I can stun a ball forward a foot with center ball on a long straight to near straight shot.
Not sure what your problem is. I'm not in any camp. I don't know much about physics at all. I'm just saying knowledge doesn't directly translate to playing ability.
 

easy-e

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
download.jpg

Someone's gotta be able to explain this thing to me though.
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'd love to show you high speed video ... As long as the cueball is regulation size and weight (and doesn't jump or something) this just isn't possible. When straight in, you must have spin to move the cueball in any direction.

FYI, here's a good video (including slow motion) illustrating these effects:


And more videos and other info can be found on the drag effects resource page.
 

The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
View attachment 591792
Someone's gotta be able to explain this thing to me though.
lol... Damn you... When I was catching up on the thread and got to parts wherein "following with no spin with a stun shot" were being claimed. I thought of Newton's Cradle but couldn't recall what it was called. While searching for a good vid, you posted this.
 

The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
I must be a magician cause I can stun a ball forward a foot with center ball on a long straight to near straight shot.
Magic is simply something that can't be readily explained by the viewer. Much like this is just you not understanding what's happening to the CB when you hit this shot
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
I'll spot the world's leading physicist 9 games in a race to 11. Knowledge of physics and playing ability aren't necessarily related.
So what?

In pool and in every other field, instructors and researchers develop and advance foundational knowledge for those that wish to pursue the practice of these foundational elements. In every area of study, there is the theoretical side and the practical side, and the two are forever intertwined.

In baseball, the top hitting instructors will never get the press bestowed upon a Babe Ruth, a Hank Aaron, or a Ty Cobb, and not a single hitting instructor is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. A second-rate catcher named Charlie Lau, once he retired from competition, went on to be the most celebrated hitting instructor in his day, and Hall of Famer George Brett counts Charlie as a key influence in his success. Are Charlie's credentials diminished by the fact that he couldn't hit the baseball like George Brett (for the record, less than 100 that ever played the game could)?

When Charles Lindbergh made his famous flight across the Atlantic, he got all the press, while Donald Hall, the scientist who developed and designed his airplane got nearly none.

Let's not dismiss or belittle the theoreticians, scientists and instructors just because the impact of their efforts is less apparent to us. The achievements of others so often stand, at least in part, upon their shoulders.
 

easy-e

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So what?

In pool and in every other field, instructors and researchers develop and advance foundational knowledge for those that wish to pursue the practice of these foundational elements. In every area of study, there is the theoretical side and the practical side, and the two are forever intertwined.

In baseball, the top hitting instructors will never get the press bestowed upon a Babe Ruth, a Hank Aaron, or a Ty Cobb, and not a single hitting instructor is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. A second-rate catcher named Charlie Lau, once he retired from competition, went on to be the most celebrated hitting instructor in his day, and Hall of Famer George Brett counts Charlie as a key influence in his success. Are Charlie's credentials diminished by the fact that he couldn't hit the baseball like George Brett (for the record, less than 100 that ever played the game could)?

When Charles Lindbergh made his famous flight across the Atlantic, he got all the press, while Donald Hall, the scientist who developed and designed his airplane got nearly none.

Let's not dismiss or belittle the theoreticians, scientists and instructors just because the impact of their efforts is less apparent to us. The achievements of others so often stand, at least in part, upon their shoulders.
I appreciate the reply, but I wasn't dismissing anything. When SBC said he wanted to play against these guys because he didn't agree with their knowledge of physics, I wanted to make a point that knowledge and playing ability weren't necessarily related. That's all. Neil deGrasse Tyson probably doesn't even care if he can draw his cue ball or not. I greatly admire those who take the time to learn that kind of stuff.
 
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sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
I appreciate the reply, but I wasn't dismissing anything. When SBC said he wanted to play against these guys because he didn't agree with their knowledge of physics, I wanted to make a point that knowledge and playing ability weren't necessarily related. That's all. Neil deGrasse Tyson probably doesn't even care if he can draw his cue ball or not. I greatly admire those who take the time to learn that kind of stuff.
Well said, Easy-e.
 

BC21

Poolology
Gold Member
Silver Member
When there's a lot of distance between cb and ob, and you want to roll the cb up about a foot after hitting the ob, a drag draw shot is perfect. The cb stops spinning backwards just before striking the ob, and then it just rolls into it.
 

easy-e

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When there's a lot of distance between cb and ob, and you want to roll the cb up about a foot after hitting the ob, a drag draw shot is perfect. The cb stops spinning backwards just before striking the ob, and then it just rolls into it.
It also has to begin rolling forward slightly before contacting the OB, correct? Can't just be sliding.
 
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