The Biggest reason Lower level players can't improve ????

Archer400

Registered
Just a quick update: I've been practicing for a few days, on sleep deprivation mode since I'm going from 3rd shift to 1st shift on Monday, you know take a 3 hour nap and get an extra day of weekend...

Anyway, the Perfect Aim system felt right and made sense as soon as I saw it, but like anything, you have to put it to the test and get some practice in. The more I use it, the better it feels. It's much easier now for me to recognize how to approach the different oddball cuts aim wise. I still have to think just a bit, but it's getting automatic rather quickly. I'm playing a lot better and with a lot less hesitation on shots that used to have me up and down and re-chalking a couple times. I knew they didn't look like they would go in before, but didn't understand why. It's because my eyes weren't right. Before learning the system, eventually through standing up, re-chalking, walking around the table, etc. I would either make the shot/find an alternate shot/get lucky/or dog it.

Now, I'm making those shots first time down at the table with very little hesitation. The only time I feel the dreaded "this will probably miss" mental chatter is on odd banks that I haven't ever really learned. I will say, even banks are feeling a lot more natural though and are definitely the next part of my game needing strengthening and learning. I've never truly put work or practice into banks and I have confidence now to do so. Do I still miss? Of course I do, but I'm only 10 months or so into pool after a 8 year hiatus and playing on a larger more unforgiving table with much faster cloth. I will say however with Perfect Aim system, I'm making a hell of a lot more shots and winning more than I did before learning the system. It's made me more confident to shoot shots that I feared before, usually resulting in the ball being pocketed.

I asked my wife, who is an honest woman if she thought I was playing better after we played a few hours of 8 and 9 ball. She said "You're definitely shooting a lot better." She's not the type to lie and would bust my balls just like a best friend if it were warranted while playing. So yeah, it works. I honestly think this could benefit anyone. I've played for a long time and most of my pool knowledge and ability is through just grinding to hell and back, info from random players, along with reading and trying some pool book stuff. I've never ever believed in any aiming system because I felt they all fell short. At most, I felt other systems were a reference point, but you still had to shoot by feel. Either they didn't work in all scenarios, didn't work as well as the feel I had developed, or were just to difficult to mess with when I already could aim by "feel." That's one thing I love about Perfect Aim system, it's not really a traditional system, and the "feel" I've developed still works, just now I'm hitting and seeing correctly. The shots go how you imagined/felt them, and you don't have to keep second guessing, standing up and re-chalking. It's not going to erase the system or feel you already use, but it's a foundation that's every bit as important as stroke. If your stroke was causing problems, you would put in the grind to fix it. The difference in what you're seeing is sort of subtle, in the fact you probably won't recognize it on your own, but it's a world of difference in results.

I strongly believe if you're ever second guessing yourself, hearing that little bastard in your head saying you're not going to make it, or having to get up and re-chalk more than you would like Gene can help you out.

Thanks for the lesson Gene, you've made pool a lot more enjoyable, the balls drop more often and given me a confidence boost to keep improving my game.
I totally agree!
Really the only time I miss is when I over adjust for english
I showed a friend how easy you can pocket balls when you are just shooting them and not worrying about setup.
With this system.
He was impressed.
Gene doenst really teach you about ball control.
It is all about seeing the ball correctly.
But once you see that. You actually get a much better feel for cue ball control too.
 

ChicagoRJ

EEEEEXCELLENT ;)
Gold Member
Silver Member
Mini consumer advocate point:

Pros don't miss much because their technique is grooved to that degree of repetitive consistency. This has to do with the personal universe of the pro and not any readily observable, much less copyable details.

Really? So, getting their eyes lined up perfectly every time is not part of that repetitive consistency? They step into the shot correctly most of the time..most level amateurs have no knowledge of that technique
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Years ago, I used to say "if I can see it, I can make it".

By that, I meant I could hit the object ball exactly where I planned on hitting it...not pocketing a ball that was impossible.

Being able to "see" the shot and having the "mechanics" to enable it are the keys.
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my heros.
Silver Member
Years ago, I used to say "if I can see it, I can make it".

By that, I meant I could hit the object ball exactly where I planned on hitting it...not pocketing a ball that was impossible.

Being able to "see" the shot and having the "mechanics" to enable it are the keys.

This is what I call visualizing the shot, working out what you must do to make it, then actually doing what you planned exactly. Not an easy task. If it was everyone would be a great player.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is what I call visualizing the shot, working out what you must do to make it, then actually doing what you planned exactly. Not an easy task. If it was everyone would be a great player.

I have incorporated that into my PSR. Works 100%. The misses don't count.
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If I can see it , I can make it..

Years ago, I used to say "if I can see it, I can make it".

By that, I meant I could hit the object ball exactly where I planned on hitting it...not pocketing a ball that was impossible.

Being able to "see" the shot and having the "mechanics" to enable it are the keys.

Some things never change. When it snows it is white, when it rains it's wet.

If the shot looks right you can make it.

Once the shot looks right you can work on the mechanics and get them correct because the brain will actually help coordinate the whole process.

Now things start to make sense to you, your brain and your game.

Thanks you for your words of wisdom.....:thumbup:
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my heros.
Silver Member
Nothing was on TV last night worth watching, I started REREADING:

99 Critical Shot in Pool, by Ray Martin. Just the introduction section, he hit the nail on the head.

How to become a BETTER PLAYER.

Read, reread, learn, practice, lean what Ray teaches.

Take th book to the Pool Room, or your home table, it's wonderful.

Simple book to understand, and learn from.
 
Last edited:

ideologist

I don't never exaggerate
Silver Member
Nothing was on TV last night worth watching, I started REREADING:

99 Critical Shot in Pool, by Ray Martin. Just the introduction section, he hit the nail on the head.

How to become a BETTER PLAYER.

Read, reread, learn, practice, lean what Ray teaches.

Take th book to the Pool Toom, or your home table, it's wonderful.

Simple book to understand, and learn from.


What are your favorite passages?
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks JV.....

Oh thank god... I was worried this thread wouldn't get bumped back to the top

Had a guy come in the pool hall 3 weeks ago and was right in my face. I noticed he was coughing, kind of clearing his throat alot. I said to him are you sick. He said no, I just got a sore throat, left the window open last night.

I found out 6 days latter I was sick with a sore throat. 3 days latter I got tested for covid and it was negative, Had the flu. I was really really sick. At 67 years old the flu is pretty brutal. Forgot to get a flu shot. My bad.

I didn't do any lessons for awhile. So no noise on the thread here. It's the players that I show that get on here and try to tell players.

At your level of play your almost there all the time. Most players regardless of level of play get off track when the shot looks bad. They can't grind it out very well.

Feeling better now and trying to get back in stroke myself.

Good Luck with your game....
 

genomachino

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
All fits together like a puzzle...

I totally agree!
Really the only time I miss is when I over adjust for english
I showed a friend how easy you can pocket balls when you are just shooting them and not worrying about setup.
With this system.
He was impressed.
Gene doenst really teach you about ball control.
It is all about seeing the ball correctly.
But once you see that. You actually get a much better feel for cue ball control too.

The nice thing about your game is you have done so much work already trying to play better but were just kind of stuck. Once you understood this missing piece of the puzzle and applied it to the rest of your game your results are off the chart literally.

Players are at so many different levels. Some can't even make a bridge, play once a week. Once these players can actually see the shot correctly they all of a sudden have hope where it just seemed like mission impossible. Many times these players improve at a rapid pace because they start playing more because it is more fun making balls. Now the other parts of the game start to make sense.

Even the players at the master level are struggling with this. They could cut their misses in half right away once they understand this.

Bottom line is it will help everyone.

Thanks again and I'll see you at the poolhall for the tuneup.

Been sick and just getting back to full strength again.

No Covid19 but was worried. Had the flu. :thumbup:
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Really? So, getting their eyes lined up perfectly every time is not part of that repetitive consistency? They step into the shot correctly most of the time..most level amateurs have no knowledge of that technique

Just noticed this. Obviously you need some kind of visual reference to play pool. I'm more concerned with where my stick fits into the image. IT after all does the actual shooting.

Mini consumer advocate point:

Pros don't miss much because their technique is grooved to that degree of repetitive consistency. This has to do with the personal universe of the pro and not any readily observable, much less copyable details.

I gotta say this covers it. Stand.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Just noticed this. Obviously you need some kind of visual reference to play pool. I'm more concerned with where my stick fits into the image. IT after all does the actual shooting.

I used to move my stick to get it in line if the shot didn't feel right. It had basically become an unconscious habit. Using perfect aim, as I get down, my stick is in line and exactly where it needs to be. It just feels right and natural. When you have the aim point while standing, you naturally fall into place with the stick where it needs to be. Obviously you still look at the tip to make sure it's in the correct place for what you're asking the CB to do.

I was super tired the other day, felt myself feeling the need to move my stick when down on the shot. I had got lazy and fell into the old habits for a shot and I missed by a few inches. It was pretty surprising, because I've not been missing the type of shot much lately. I re-set up the shot and followed the perfect aim routine and sunk the shot.

It's really helped me with consistency and certain shots that I used to avoid, it's only been a few weeks but it just feels so natural that you don't really have to rebuild your game to incorporate it. As far as shot making, now that I'm aiming right I feel I'm better I was several years ago before I stopped playing, but I'm still rebuilding my pattern recognition and ability to analyze the layout of the table/patterns and such. I feel it's coming along much quicker now that I'm actually aiming right and sinking shots. It's gave me more confidence to actually bank balls and work on stuff I just never bothered with before.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If your eyes are out of place, how do you know your stick isn't? Obviously you need both.

pj
chgo

Just countering the notion that eyes make the shot.

@ Boogie as well,

What I do is set the stick while I'm standing above the shot. I then get into position "around" it. This move solves the crosswind landing effect by parking the stick and landing the body separately.
 

ChicagoRJ

EEEEEXCELLENT ;)
Gold Member
Silver Member
If your eyes are out of place, how do you know your stick isn't? Obviously you need both.

pj
chgo

Dude, where did I say that’s not important? But the eyes have to be aligned correctly. Again, many good shooters already know it, or have found the right spot by accident, or by trial and errors, whatever. But this is for a amateurs who admit they are inconsistent, and that usually means it’s their stroke or their eyes, and in many cases both.

Teaching folks the tangent line, banking, long and thin cut shots, etc doesn’t really help if the first two things are not perfect. Hence why some folks take lessons and say they didn’t get better.... that’s because they can’t. And either the instructor didn’t identify the problem

Or they gave up, and moved on to other stuff because the student will feel like they got more bang for the buck. Working on their stroke is boring and tedious, but it must be done. They may not thank you that day, but they will thank you in a month after they’ve been playing at league or tourneys.

Many or most low and medium level players will tell you they hate straight in shots, advanced players would love to be straight in for the money.
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just countering the notion that eyes make the shot.

@ Boogie as well,

What I do is set the stick while I'm standing above the shot. I then get into position "around" it. This move solves the crosswind landing effect by parking the stick and landing the body separately.

And i would say most people set there eyes first, then bring everything else into that alignment.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
And i would say most people set there eyes first, then bring everything else into that alignment.

Problem I've always had with the regular way is perspective distortion. So nowadays I lock the stick to the shot first and then get into a stance that I know will stroke it straight.
Also I'm talking picture perfect object ball; not just rattling a pool pocket. Granted this is just practice and I've never played for money in this manner but this is all the pool I get around to for now - and I while I don't get out more, I'm getting out "better" .
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
...getting their eyes lined up perfectly every time is not part of that repetitive consistency?

I'm more concerned with where my stick fits into the image.

If your eyes are out of place, how do you know your stick isn't? Obviously you need both.

Dude, where did I say that’s not important?
Dude, where did I say you said that? :)

I quoted you only to give context to my response meant for straightline. Sorry if it was confusing.

pj
chgo
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I drove up from Atlanta to Philly to my hometown to visit family a few days ago. Got out to the poolroom in Philly for the first time today. I played one hole with a guy I've been battling with since I was about 17 (I'm 42 now). He almost always beats me, sometimes even giving me 9-7 or so. Today we played even. We played 7 games. I lost one game when all was said and done. Much better than I normally do with him. We were playing on a one hole table. A GC4 with extended cushions. Very tight. I was firing in balls from everywhere. I had so much confidence, even shooting off the end rail into my hole. The balls simply hit center pocket. Balls I'd be 40% to make I was taking on and splitting the wicket. I didn't even care that I lost in the end, I was so impressed how straight I was shooting. I'm going to play in the weekly 9 ball handicapped tourney tomorrow night. I think its been about 15 years since I won it. I'll report back.
 
Top