This spot shot bullshit has got to stop

BasementDweller

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My opinion is that this format favors the strong, not the weak.

A Fargo 675 will almost never win a spot shot shootout against a Fargo 775, as the cueing skills of the 775 are usually so much stronger. Hence, unless the weaker player can win both races to four, they're usually going to be out of luck.

I think this format virtually ensures that Cinderella stories will be few and far between in this new event series. I think we'll see a super-strong final four in almost every one of these events.

The world's straightest shooters, which means Gorst and Shaw in my books, should have incredibly strong action in events like these.
That's true for the most part, but don't sleep on the lower Fargo rated players when it comes to mastering a pet shot. If we go down the road a ways, there will be many many players that can make this shot for days. Right now players are still using their full cueing action to make this shot, but this shot is really more about alignment. This shot could be made over and over again with a couple inch stroke.
 

easy-e

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Why wait until Arizona Open in 2023? There are plenty of stops coming up, such as Wisconsin Open, Las Vegas Open, Michigan, Ohio and Puerto Rico. If you do well in enough tournaments, you may get enough points to be invited for the Predator World 10-Ball. That's the tournament where Predator is really pouring in the money.

One of the 5th-8th is Fargo 718.
I can’t hang with these guys. I’ll only do AZ or Vegas because I work too much. I do love these tournaments though!
 

sjm

Older and Wiser
Silver Member
That's true for the most part, but don't sleep on the lower Fargo rated players when it comes to mastering a pet shot. If we go down the road a ways, there will be many many players that can make this shot for days. Right now players are still using their full cueing action to make this shot, but this shot is really more about alignment. This shot could be made over and over again with a couple inch stroke.
Interesting point which I hadn't considered. I can see mastering the first four shootout shots, but once you put the cue ball on diamond seven, I think it's a tough shot that takes superior cueing.

Thanks for sharing your point of view here. I'll keep my eyes open and see how this develops.
 

mikepage

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Interesting point which I hadn't considered. I can see mastering the first four shootout shots, but once you put the cue ball on diamond seven, I think it's a tough shot that takes superior cueing.

Thanks for sharing your point of view here. I'll keep my eyes open and see how this develops.
One thing I noticed is players were pretty split on
(A) rolling cueball that went two rails into the head (short) rail
(B) closer to stunned cueball that went two rails and through table center into the opposite long rail

Ruiz in the semifinal did (A) consistently. Roland Garcia did (B) until one time he made it but almost drew into the 1st corner. That spooked him, and next shot he did (A). Memory was short, though and he reverted back to (B) for the next one.

(B) allows you to stroke more firmly. That's maybe a plus when you're feeling the pressure. (A) has less cut-induced throw.

Anything else to consider?
 

sjm

Older and Wiser
Silver Member
One thing I noticed is players were pretty split on
(A) rolling cueball that went two rails into the head (short) rail
(B) closer to stunned cueball that went two rails and through table center into the opposite long rail

Ruiz in the semifinal did (A) consistently. Roland Garcia did (B) until one time he made it but almost drew into the 1st corner. That spooked him, and next shot he did (A). Memory was short, though and he reverted back to (B) for the next one.

(B) allows you to stroke more firmly. That's maybe a plus when you're feeling the pressure. (A) has less cut-induced throw.

Anything else to consider?
Good post. I think you've covered it quite comprehensively.
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
One thing I noticed is players were pretty split on
(A) rolling cueball that went two rails into the head (short) rail
(B) closer to stunned cueball that went two rails and through table center into the opposite long rail


Ruiz in the semifinal did (A) consistently. Roland Garcia did (B) until one time he made it but almost drew into the 1st corner. That spooked him, and next shot he did (A). Memory was short, though and he reverted back to (B) for the next one.

(B) allows you to stroke more firmly. That's maybe a plus when you're feeling the pressure. (A) has less cut-induced throw.

Anything else to consider?
It sure seems to me like it would be (B) that has less cut induced throw because gearing english (or something nearing it anyway) is typically used with (B), and (B) also tends to be hit firmer, both of which working to reduce cut induced throw over what (A) produces. Of course the trade off is that with (B) (if gearing english was used) you now have squirt and swerve that you have to deal with that you would not have with (A) (as long as no side spin was used).
 
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mikepage

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Good post. I think you've covered it quite comprehensively.
1642373956632.png


Thanks. This--Atencio--is a typical (A) shot. This is about 1 second after cueball contact. Notice how nicely Jesus stays down on the shot.
 

mikepage

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It was nice of Oi to get out of the way so you could see where the (B) shot hits the first rail. Yes, this is 1 second after that tip struck that cueball
1642374248673.png
 

Dead Money

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
One thing I noticed is players were pretty split on
(A) rolling cueball that went two rails into the head (short) rail
(B) closer to stunned cueball that went two rails and through table center into the opposite long rail

Ruiz in the semifinal did (A) consistently. Roland Garcia did (B) until one time he made it but almost drew into the 1st corner. That spooked him, and next shot he did (A). Memory was short, though and he reverted back to (B) for the next one.

(B) allows you to stroke more firmly. That's maybe a plus when you're feeling the pressure. (A) has less cut-induced throw.

Anything else to consider?
For me I always like to let a cue ball do what all balls want to do once struck with a cue...roll forward so the follow spot shot is my first choice. I think for this level of player it is a preference thing like it is for anyone that plays. In game situations of course the next ball dictates what you do.
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
SVB said he won't play in these events because of the spot shot and the racking that eliminates his ability to run out.

View attachment 624736
When players start chirping about the game, sometimes they are right, but never always.
A given' in the world of top end play....others, like Souquet have a different approach and too will speak out.
Change, like in pro tennis....they used to complain, can't remember the year.
But when the money got good....they/the heard will Always follow.
Camel got em goin' for awhile, and led em like birds to water.
I was quite impressed with most of those men. :)
I'm not throwing dirt, it's just part of the game.
It's how they roll.

Change..........it's finally got a SHot. And it's not Scott the Shot Smith.

Business perceives their perspective, quite differently than pro pool players.
But I like it, when they speak up, good stuff.
Time will Play, and Rackin' will continue.

Personally I think in match play.
When you lose, You rack.
Winner breaks race to 11.
Mount a high powered camera over the rack area, that can be ck'd by a ref visually.
I'd much rather watch these youngster ''show their stuff'' rackin, like the golfers do pickin' up their balls.
This is an important part of match play, that's been overlooked.
Amazingly, it will Dramatically speed up match times/period.

1. Your racking/remembering/assuming the position.
2. Me, like a tennis player, I'm comin' at yah.
3. It's still my serve, powerful position to be, in this game of 9 ball.

It's quite amazing, how many games you can play in one hour.

A Great use of time for both players, one to reflect/rack, the other preparing to brake.
It's animal, and in a good natural way.

Thank you Matchroom, for lighting the match, it's not another Camel. :)
bm
 
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jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member

westcoast

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I prefer that matches end in the traditional way. However, one can't deny the added suspense that the shootout adds. It certainly draws in the attention of the crowd
 

mikepage

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That was kind of cool. I noticed they were shooting from the first diamond and we always used to shoot the spot shot from the second diamond (the head string). This way is a little more difficult. What happens if someone makes the ball and scratches?
These shots, from 1st diamond, are in sudden death phase—where you get if tied after 4 innings from 2nd diamond. Also, 10-ball is not on the spot but rather in racked 10-ball location. Scratch is a miss.
 

mikepage

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I agree, I reposted it because he has a good reason that looks like it's backed up by data.
By data, do you mean his claim that 80-90% of breaks are dry? This is at odds atlarge’s report of 50% dry breaks on the tv table And 46% for the 200 games of the final 3 days on that table. For those 200 games, he reports 20% break and runs.
 

Dead Money

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
These shots, from 1st diamond, are in sudden death phase—where you get if tied after 4 innings from 2nd diamond. Also, 10-ball is not on the spot but rather in racked 10-ball location. Scratch is a miss.
Makes it a little harder.. yes! :eek: :eek: :eek:

3rd stage...spot shot...cue frozen to the head rail?
 
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