Full splice vs. A-jointed cues vs. Full Core

Paul Dayton

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
On a full core..... you can add weight under the joint screw and the in the rear to even it out..................

Kim

Weight at the joint and at the butt is not the same as weight in the middle. As an example a one ounce, 3 foot long carbon fiber tube with a 7 ounce weight at the butt and a 7 ounce weighted screw at the joint would behave differently than 1 ounce tube with a 14 ounce weight in the middle. The best way to weight a full splice is to determine how much weight is needed, then bore in from the butt to that spot epoxy in the weight and glue in a core to fill the hole. As far as the OP's question very few players could tell the difference and it certainly doesn't affect play.
 

jecues

JE cues
Silver Member
Joe gold makes one of the best playing cues I have ever used. His cues are a full core and uses flat laminate dowels for the core.
 

desi2960

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
joeyincal Full-splice or full one-piece core , you can't.

i have cut a couple hundred old fullsplice brunswicks, a.e. smidt, etc etc in half and many of them have metal rods 1/2 inch in diameter in the handle area, and are doweled from the handle to the butt.
i have also cut a dowling rod at the handle area, drilled and tapped it, screwed in threaded rod, then used that dowel to core a butt. therefore having weight in the handle area.

i still believe your statement be in error on this subject
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i have cut a couple hundred old fullsplice brunswicks, a.e. smidt, etc etc in half and many of them have metal rods 1/2 inch in diameter in the handle area, and are doweled from the handle to the butt.
i have also cut a dowling rod at the handle area, drilled and tapped it, screwed in threaded rod, then used that dowel to core a butt. therefore having weight in the handle area.

i still believe your statement be in error on this subject
Ah, my bad.
You can use a really long drill.
 
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scdiveteam

Rick Geschrey
Silver Member
Joe gold makes one of the best playing cues I have ever used. His cues are a full core and uses flat laminate dowels for the core.

Joey's cues are all A-joint construction and he uses a laminated maple handle tenoned to accept his butt sleeve.

And yes, I agree with you his cues are world class playing cues made to precision standards that most people could not appreciate unless they visited his shop and viewed his process. Off the wall standards.

Rick
 

Lexicologist71

Rabid Schuler fanatic
Silver Member
i have cut a couple hundred old fullsplice brunswicks, a.e. smidt, etc etc in half and many of them have metal rods 1/2 inch in diameter in the handle area, and are doweled from the handle to the butt.
i have also cut a dowling rod at the handle area, drilled and tapped it, screwed in threaded rod, then used that dowel to core a butt. therefore having weight in the handle area.

i still believe your statement be in error on this subject

I was thinking the same thing about joining coring dowels. I have yet to try it though. Glad I wasn't in left field, or at least by myself in left field.:wink:
 

oscar8

Banned
basically, since no one is willing to answer you straight up, the answer is its all bullshit. some cue makers have a talent for build quality, which makes the cue look and feel good, some others are just copying the others. the difference is the density of the wood, a soft wood is softer, and hard wood is stiffer. than add the type of tip and it changes dramatically. the RAT guy said it best, no one knows the difference. its all advertising, hershey sells more than lindt. its a more spoken of brand.
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The "hit" of a cue is DIFFERENT for every player. I have hit with cues that costs thousands of dollars that I wouldn't play with and have owned cues and played some of my best pool with that cost less than $5 to make.

I worked at a pool hall for several years when I was in my teens and I played with hundreds of cues and repaired cues and they ALL hit "different". Some "similar" to other cues, but none of them hit the "same".

It ISN'T how much the cue costs, who made it, or what it is made of! It is "does the cue COMMUNICATE with YOU?". It doesn't matter how much it communicates with WIllie Mosconi or whomever owned it or made it, it matters how much it communicates with YOU.

By "communicate", I mean "hit" or "feel". If the player can "communicate" with their cue, they KNOW what reaction is going to happen when the tip strikes the cue ball with the proper stroke.

When I look for a cue to play with, I look for the cue that "tells me the MOST".

That is hard to explain, but anybody who has played pool at a higher-than-average-Joe-level will know what I am trying to say.

It is kind of like the HAMB thing. If you "hit a million balls", you will figure it out. If you try enough cues, you will find one that has the "hit" that talks to you.

That is until you want something MORE. Then the search for the "Holy Grail" cue begins.

Aloha.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The "hit" of a cue is DIFFERENT for every player. I have hit with cues that costs thousands of dollars that I wouldn't play with and have owned cues and played some of my best pool with that cost less than $5 to make.

I worked at a pool hall for several years when I was in my teens and I played with hundreds of cues and repaired cues and they ALL hit "different". Some "similar" to other cues, but none of them hit the "same".

It ISN'T how much the cue costs, who made it, or what it is made of! It is "does the cue COMMUNICATE with YOU?". It doesn't matter how much it communicates with WIllie Mosconi or whomever owned it or made it, it matters how much it communicates with YOU.

By "communicate", I mean "hit" or "feel". If the player can "communicate" with their cue, they KNOW what reaction is going to happen when the tip strikes the cue ball with the proper stroke.

When I look for a cue to play with, I look for the cue that "tells me the MOST".

That is hard to explain, but anybody who has played pool at a higher-than-average-Joe-level will know what I am trying to say.

It is kind of like the HAMB thing. If you "hit a million balls", you will figure it out. If you try enough cues, you will find one that has the "hit" that talks to you.

That is until you want something MORE. Then the search for the "Holy Grail" cue begins.

Aloha.
You mean like a two-piece cue that hits like an old house cue?
 

scdiveteam

Rick Geschrey
Silver Member
Hi,

I always thought house cues sucked as a rule even when you found one that rolled good.

Two piece cues with custom shaft tapers and balanced butt engineering and solid construction have many permutations for the replete cue maker to control concerning whatever playability one would ever want.

Cue makers who make fancy cues do so because people want them and fancy cues does not equate to a cue that plays bad or good.

The old adage that one piece cues play the best is an urban legend or old wife's tale IMO.

JMO,

Rick
 
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HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hi,

I always thought house cues sucked as a rule even when you found one that rolled good.

Two piece cues with custom shaft tapers and balanced butt engineering and solid construction have many permutations for the replete cue maker to control concerning whatever playability one would ever want.

Cue makers who make fancy cues do so because people want them and fancy cues does not equate to a cue that plays bad.

The old adage that one piece cues play the best is an urban legend or old wife's tale IMO.

JMO,

Rick

I agree 100%.

I NEVER said that a house cue played better than any other cue. I said when a player finds a cue that "communicates" the best with that player then that is what "they" consider "hit", "feel", or "playability".

Doesn't matter how many pieces the cue is or how it is made.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The good house cues are 57" full spliced cues with no wrap.
Their only drawbacks are they're shorter in total length and have
one taper from tip to the bottom. Hence the shafts get too fat
in the middle. And most just had hammered on fiber ferrule.
In terms of feel, IMO no matter what fairy dust you sprinkle at
sectional cues, they'll never feel better in the grip hand than
the great old house cues.
Custom shafts will play better for most bc of the taper but
the feel on the grip is a different animal.
So if I can make my cue with a more playable shaft and the grip
communicates like a house cue,I'm happy.
 

SpotOn

Registered
joeyincal

On A-jointed cues, you can add weight in the middle.
Full-splice or full one-piece core , you can't.


i'm not too sure if that statement is totally correct.

chuck starkey
You build the cue using a dry inserted pin to find the balance point and if needed you remove the pin, add some weight and glue the pin in place. This is how a single core cue is adjustable.
 
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