My Friend Ronnie Allen

Keith McCready

Pro Player
I've been sitting here 4 or 5 days now, trying to put it all together about Ronnie's death, and I finally have enough strength to say a little something about him.

For whatever it's worth, Ronnie was an action man. He loved pool, tried to pretend like he hated pool sometimes, but he loved winning. Money was his real high, whether it was golf, fishing, horses, or even turtle racing.

What a lot of people may not realize, Ronnie was a true hustler. He took care of a family, which he has three kids, and every one of them turned out to be a champion. If you don't know what I mean by that, I mean well educated, well mannered, and very nice to be around.

I remember being on the road with Ronnie. I mean, I can't get into all the details. We had a couple of bad times, but way more good times than bad. Every time he made money, he would go to the Western Union and send his wife Faye some money, and that was at a time when he was really dedicated to his family. This showed me a lot about Ronnie.

I learned growing up, I had the privilege of being around Ronnie a lot. When I was 15 years old, the first time I saw Ronnie, he was playing in a straight pool tournament at the Elks Lodge in Los Angeles on 4-1/2-by-9 tables. This is when Joe Balsis, Luther Lassiter, Irving Crane, Boston Shorty, Grady Mathews, Larry Lisciotti, Peter Margo, and all the other great players of that era were competing regularly. It was in the early '70s. He was barking at everybody, telling them how nitty they were, trying to get their goat, so he could get played. But a lot of the players were scared of him.

And then there was a place called The Billiard Palace, and that's where all the money games took place at. It was Vern Peterson's place, who was also known as a great straight pool player. It was here where me and Ronnie took off together. He showed me everything as far as moving the cueball. He took the time to do that with me, and it just seemed like as years went on, a lot of my demeanor, needless to say, was like Ronnie. We both like to chatter, but back then everybody did it. As of now, everybody seems to be quiet as a churchmouse. It's just different.

I lost my mother when I was about 10, and my family kind of broke apart when I was 12. Ronnie Allen was kind of like a second father to me. He showed me the ins and outs, whether it was right or wrong. He explained everything to me to make me aware of how people would try to approach me to play, how they would act, how you would counter, and all the rest of it.

I will miss Ronnie very much. I wish we could have another 40 years together, but we can't. See ya' soon, R.A.

There's so much more I could write. I'm still trying to digest all this. Two friends of mine, two of my best friends, gone with 3 months time frame. I just can't write any more right now.
 
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Luther Blissett

on the clapham omnibus
Silver Member
Hey Mr McCready, that was a moving and obviously heartfelt post. Although I have not met either of you and will surely now never meet Mr Allen, I feel as though I know you both at least a little bit better after reading your post.

Please accept my condolences at this time.

It's been a pleasure to watch you kicking ass on youtube, and just now it was a pleasure to read your warm and kind tribute to your friend. Although the subject is a sad one, it's encouraging to see a very talented player write in such a human and down-to-earth way.
 

cardiac kid

Super Senior Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Keith,

Wish I could tell you the pain will ease. Lost my best friend over ten years ago. Still grieve today. Ronnie was a lucky man to have known you. And you, him. Glad my earlier post was able to put a smile on your face. If even for only one moment. Please, please take the time with Jen to write that book! We all miss you.

Lyn
 

jgpool

Cue ball draw with this?
Silver Member
Good post Keith. I have never met you but I have seen you play. I met Ronnie one time, unfortunatly for me it was in compeition and I didn't like the six pack he put on me before I shot. He was fun to watch, and I did. My condolences to you Keith, Jennie and Ronnie's loved ones. RIP R.A.
 

wincardona

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've been sitting here 4 or 5 days now, trying to put it all together about Ronnie's death, and I finally have enough strength to say a little something about him.

For whatever it's worth, Ronnie was an action man. He loved pool, tried to pretend like he hated pool sometimes, but he loved winning. Money was his real high, whether it was golf, fishing, horses, or even turtle racing.

What a lot of people may not realize, Ronnie was a true hustler. He took care of a family, which he has three kids, and every one of them turned out to be a champion. If you don't know what I mean by that, I mean well educated, well mannered, and very nice to be around.

I remember being on the road with Ronnie. I mean, I can't get into all the details. We had a couple of bad times, but way more good times than bad. Every time he made money, he would go to the Western Union and send his wife Faye some money, and that was at a time when he was really dedicated to his family. This showed me a lot about Ronnie.

I learned growing up, I had the privilege of being around Ronnie a lot. When I was 15 years old, the first time I saw Ronnie, he was playing in a straight pool tournament at the Elks Lodge in Los Angeles on 4-1/2-by-9 tables. This is when Joe Balsis, Luther Lassiter, Irving Crane, Boston Shorty, Grady Mathews, Larry Lisciotti, Peter Margo, and all the other great players of that era were competing regularly. It was in the early '70s. He was barking at everybody, telling them how nitty they were, trying to get their goat, so he could get played. But a lot of the players were scared of him.

And then there was a place called The Billiard Palace, and that's where all the money games took place at. It was Vern Peterson's place, who was also known as a great straight pool player. It was here where me and Ronnie took off together. He showed me everything as far as moving the cueball. He took the time to do that with me, and it just seemed like as years went on, a lot of my demeanor, needless to say, was like Ronnie. We both like to chatter, but back then everybody did it. As of now, everybody seems to be quiet as a churchmouse. It's just different.

I lost my mother when I was about 10, and my family kind of broke apart when I was 12. Ronnie Allen was kind of like a second father to me. He showed me the ins and outs, whether it was right or wrong. He explained everything to me to make me aware of how people would try to approach me to play, how they would act, how you would counter, and all the rest of it.

I will miss Ronnie very much. I wish we could have another 40 years together, but we can't. See ya' soon, R.A.

There's so much more I could write. I'm still trying to digest all this. Two friends of mine, two of my best friends, gone with 3 months time frame. I just can't write any more right now.

Keith, I know how much you loved Ronnie, I was around the Billiard Palace during the time you were coming around and everyone said that you were the "little Ronnie" You emulated Ronnie by acting, and even talking like him. Ain't that right "catbird" You're also ...right on...about when you say that Ronnie would constantly send Faye money when he made scores while on the road. I have been on the road with Ronnie several times like you had and he ......ALWAYS....sent money to Faye for the family. Quite unlike many of the other pool hustlers that I have hustled with and been around. Ronnie was one of a kind whose legend will continue to grow. My condolences go out to you and every one else that loved Ronnie, he will be sorely missed, especially by the ones that knew him well.

He was also a champion snorer, keeping me up at nights, but I still loved him.

By the way, I miss being around you too. Love you "catbird"

Bill Incardona
 

richiebalto

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Beautiful story, i love the old time pool playing stories.

You are the best Keith, we all love you, i would bet on that!
 

ceebee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Nice words Keith, it's tough to do in the shadow of the sad loss.

Ronnie will be missed, but not forgotten, just like all the champions are missed, but not forgotten. They are the GOLD in this game, they are the memories & foundation. We are the future & the now, it depends on us & what we add to "the Game".
 

Cuebuddy

Mini cues
Silver Member
Sorry for your loss......all of our loss. It sure is nice to read a small piece of yours and Ronnie's life. RIP RA
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
Keith, I feel so fortunate to have spent so much time around you and Ronnie. You are truly two of a kind, no one like either of you in the pool world today. American originals both of you! And both so talented too! You put fear in EVERYONE Keith, I was there to see it. All their faces got long when they found out they had to play you. Your high gear was one notch above them all!

And Ronnie did the same in One Pocket. He taught them all lessons on how to play the game. He played a different game then anyone before or since. I hope you're okay back there in the cold weather. We all miss you in California. They never stop talking about you out here. Your a legend Keither!
 

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've been sitting here 4 or 5 days now, trying to put it all together about Ronnie's death, and I finally have enough strength to say a little something about him.

For whatever it's worth, Ronnie was an action man. He loved pool, tried to pretend like he hated pool sometimes, but he loved winning. Money was his real high, whether it was golf, fishing, horses, or even turtle racing.

What a lot of people may not realize, Ronnie was a true hustler. He took care of a family, which he has three kids, and every one of them turned out to be a champion. If you don't know what I mean by that, I mean well educated, well mannered, and very nice to be around.

I remember being on the road with Ronnie. I mean, I can't get into all the details. We had a couple of bad times, but way more good times than bad. Every time he made money, he would go to the Western Union and send his wife Faye some money, and that was at a time when he was really dedicated to his family. This showed me a lot about Ronnie.

I learned growing up, I had the privilege of being around Ronnie a lot. When I was 15 years old, the first time I saw Ronnie, he was playing in a straight pool tournament at the Elks Lodge in Los Angeles on 4-1/2-by-9 tables. This is when Joe Balsis, Luther Lassiter, Irving Crane, Boston Shorty, Grady Mathews, Larry Lisciotti, Peter Margo, and all the other great players of that era were competing regularly. It was in the early '70s. He was barking at everybody, telling them how nitty they were, trying to get their goat, so he could get played. But a lot of the players were scared of him.

And then there was a place called The Billiard Palace, and that's where all the money games took place at. It was Vern Peterson's place, who was also known as a great straight pool player. It was here where me and Ronnie took off together. He showed me everything as far as moving the cueball. He took the time to do that with me, and it just seemed like as years went on, a lot of my demeanor, needless to say, was like Ronnie. We both like to chatter, but back then everybody did it. As of now, everybody seems to be quiet as a churchmouse. It's just different.

I lost my mother when I was about 10, and my family kind of broke apart when I was 12. Ronnie Allen was kind of like a second father to me. He showed me the ins and outs, whether it was right or wrong. He explained everything to me to make me aware of how people would try to approach me to play, how they would act, how you would counter, and all the rest of it.

I will miss Ronnie very much. I wish we could have another 40 years together, but we can't. See ya' soon, R.A.

There's so much more I could write. I'm still trying to digest all this. Two friends of mine, two of my best friends, gone with 3 months time frame. I just can't write any more right now.

Hello Keith,
My condolences go out to you for your loss of a second father and best friend. My condolences goes out to Ronnie's family. Keith I truly understand your pain and your loss. Hang in there and be strong as you can, give Jam a few hugs to help keep you going strong. Lean on her shoulder to make your days go a long. I thank you for sharing this part of your life with us. Again I am very sorry for your loss. Rest in peace, Ronnie!
Many Regards,
Lock N Load.
 
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wahcheck

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thank you Mr. McCready

Nice to see a tribute from one legend to another.........my condolences....
 

The Saw

Juicy Pop in 2016!
Silver Member
I've been sitting here 4 or 5 days now, trying to put it all together about Ronnie's death, and I finally have enough strength to say a little something about him.

For whatever it's worth, Ronnie was an action man. He loved pool, tried to pretend like he hated pool sometimes, but he loved winning. Money was his real high, whether it was golf, fishing, horses, or even turtle racing.

What a lot of people may not realize, Ronnie was a true hustler. He took care of a family, which he has three kids, and every one of them turned out to be a champion. If you don't know what I mean by that, I mean well educated, well mannered, and very nice to be around.

I remember being on the road with Ronnie. I mean, I can't get into all the details. We had a couple of bad times, but way more good times than bad. Every time he made money, he would go to the Western Union and send his wife Faye some money, and that was at a time when he was really dedicated to his family. This showed me a lot about Ronnie.

I learned growing up, I had the privilege of being around Ronnie a lot. When I was 15 years old, the first time I saw Ronnie, he was playing in a straight pool tournament at the Elks Lodge in Los Angeles on 4-1/2-by-9 tables. This is when Joe Balsis, Luther Lassiter, Irving Crane, Boston Shorty, Grady Mathews, Larry Lisciotti, Peter Margo, and all the other great players of that era were competing regularly. It was in the early '70s. He was barking at everybody, telling them how nitty they were, trying to get their goat, so he could get played. But a lot of the players were scared of him.

And then there was a place called The Billiard Palace, and that's where all the money games took place at. It was Vern Peterson's place, who was also known as a great straight pool player. It was here where me and Ronnie took off together. He showed me everything as far as moving the cueball. He took the time to do that with me, and it just seemed like as years went on, a lot of my demeanor, needless to say, was like Ronnie. We both like to chatter, but back then everybody did it. As of now, everybody seems to be quiet as a churchmouse. It's just different.

I lost my mother when I was about 10, and my family kind of broke apart when I was 12. Ronnie Allen was kind of like a second father to me. He showed me the ins and outs, whether it was right or wrong. He explained everything to me to make me aware of how people would try to approach me to play, how they would act, how you would counter, and all the rest of it.

I will miss Ronnie very much. I wish we could have another 40 years together, but we can't. See ya' soon, R.A.

There's so much more I could write. I'm still trying to digest all this. Two friends of mine, two of my best friends, gone with 3 months time frame. I just can't write any more right now.

Tap, tap, tap......
 

ShanksMcShankly

Grid Lock
Silver Member
Well said Keith, I'm glad I got to share some of your memories of such an immense legend. You words and your presence here is truly appreciated by a very great many. I feel your pain and wish you well in this dark time.

I know breaking racks and running balls makes me feel better when I'm upset. Maybe it will work for you the same way. It seems the proper way to remember the man himself.

R.I.P Ronnie Allen
 

Ken_4fun

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Nice post Keith...

I had to smile when I thought about Ronnie Allen and Keith McCready on the road together.....:eek:

Nobody knew what hit them before it was too late.

Ken
 

poolhallringer

Registered
Ronnie Allen

Sorry to hear of Ronnie's passing and condolences to you Kieth and all his family and friends. Ronnie was 1 in a million and he could beat the best, in fact,
Efren once quit him stuck 5g's at hardtimes! I still have a copy of that one pocket challenge match with Deliberto at the Golden 8 ball in Phoenix-a classic!
I can still hear him complain about the tables bein wet lol. He along with Grady will be greatly missed!:sad:
 

RunoutJJ

Professional Banger
Silver Member
Very well said Keith. Im sure the times you two had together mount to 10 times the years of a normal life. Im sorry for your deep loss and I hope you feel better. As said before you both are true legends and true legends never die... As long as people talk about you you never truly leave us mere mortals....

RIP Ronnie and I hope you feel better soon Keith :frown:
 
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